Wensmann family — all hands working together

Don Wensmann gathers with his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren on three holidays each year. Pictured with him at Thanksgiving this year are all his living children, front row (from left): Diane Roske, Cindy Wensmann, Brenda Yorek, Don Wensmann, Sandra Herdering, Wanda Rathbun and Jessica Rieder. Back row: Brian, Joel, Jim, Marvin, Ken, Greg and Scott Wensmann. Mom Rita died in 2002, and four siblings have gone: infant Joseph, Mark in 1985, Doris Landowski in 2008 and Wayne in 2011.

Don Wensmann gathers with his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren on three holidays each year. Pictured with him at Thanksgiving this year are all his living children, front row (from left): Diane Roske, Cindy Wensmann, Brenda Yorek, Don Wensmann, Sandra Herdering, Wanda Rathbun and Jessica Rieder. Back row: Brian, Joel, Jim, Marvin, Ken, Greg and Scott Wensmann. Mom Rita died in 2002, and four siblings have gone: infant Joseph, Mark in 1985, Doris Landowski in 2008 and Wayne in 2011.

By Jennie Zeitler
Staff Writer
jennie.zeitler@ecm-inc.com

The Don and Rita Wensmann family of rural Elmdale grew up strong with 17 siblings. Now with 53 grandchildren and 37 great-grandchildren, the crowd is huge at holiday time.

The year that the Elmdale Community Center was built, the Wensmanns began holding their family gatherings there. They meet at the Center three times a year — for Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.

“The kitchen is big enough that everyone can work together,” said Cindy Wensmann. “Everyone brings something to share. There is room for everybody to sit at the table at one time.”

Don is a Korean War veteran. Rita’s brother was in Don’s unit and introduced them.

The Wensmann family was established in 1953 when they married and purchased a 160-acre dairy farm near Elmdale with 10 milking cows and three brood sows.

Don used a gas-powered milker while growing up near Freeport. Milking was done by hand for the first few months in Elmdale before they got an electric milker.

“Our first cream check was $90,” Don said. “We had a $500 mortgage payment every six months.”

“Mom cried and wondered what they were going to do,” Cindy said.

“I told her, ‘We have to trust in the Lord,’” said Don.

Don Wensmann is most content seeing his family members all working together. Pictured carving ham Christmas Day are (from left): son Jim and son-in-law Gary Rieder.

Don Wensmann is most content seeing his family members all working together. Pictured carving ham Christmas Day are (from left): son Jim and son-in-law Gary
Rieder.

Soon, they started selling milk too and the checks got bigger. They were never late with a mortgage payment.

Those first three brood sows provided 38 little pigs, which were sold for $5 each.

“That was bigger than the milk check,” Don said.

But 1958 came along — a dry year. When Don was afraid they might lose the farm, he got a job with Frigidaire in St. Cloud. He worked there for three years while farming at the same time.

“I was laid off during the summer,” he said. “Then there was more time for farming.”

In 1964, they acquired a bulk milk tank.

“After that, things started to turn around pretty good,” said Don.

In 1969, a Jack Frost 15,000-chicken barn was built. An addition was made to the dairy barn in 1979.

The farm was taken over by Greg in 1991 and has grown to 347 acres, with 295 acres tillable.

Rita died in 2002, about the time the Elmdale Community Center was built. With the family continuing to grow, it just made sense to move the festivities there. There are 13 siblings still living.

To help prepare for the Christmas event, Brenda Wensmann Yorek started hosting a popcorn ball-making party at her home three years ago.

“This year, we made up 96 gift bags for Dad to give to the grandkids and great-grandkids,” she said. “Dad came too, to supervise and taste test.”

Daughter Brenda Yorek, left, and daughter-in-law Joy Wensmann prepare salads Christmas Day.

Daughter Brenda Yorek, left, and daughter-in-law Joy Wensmann prepare salads Christmas Day.

Family members are pleased that everyone gets along so well and nearly everyone makes the effort to be at the gatherings.

“It’s good seeing everyone get together, — that makes me happy,” Don said.

“Dad’s just so proud of how everyone gets along,” said Cindy. “Growing up, we never got along as good as we do now.”

“It’s been a lot of fun getting together,” said Greg. “It’s amazing how we all get along.”

The Wensmanns get together other times of the year as well, with the girls having “sister gatherings” and the boys going whitewater rafting or four-wheeling together.

Granddaughter Wendy Fischer started a Wensmann family Facebook page where family members can share stories and photos.

It all points to what makes Don happiest — seeing “all hands working together.”

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