Dairyland Peach http://dairylandpeach.com Sauk Centre, Minnesota Thu, 02 Jul 2015 01:39:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Broccoli Supreme http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/broccoli-supreme-2/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/broccoli-supreme-2/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:57:01 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21690 1 slightly beaten egg
1 pkg. (10 oz.) frozen, chopped broccoli
1 can (13 oz.) creamed corn
1 Tbsp. chopped onion
1/4 tsp. salt and pepper
3 Tbsp. butter
1 c. herb stuffing mix

In large bowl, combine egg, broccoli, corn, onion, salt, pepper. Set aside. Melt butter, toss with stuffing mix to coat. Stir 3/4 cup stuffing mix into broccoli, corn mixture. Pour into 1 1/2 quart casserole. Top with remaining stuffing mix. Microwave on high nine minutes or bake at 350° for 30 minutes.

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Creamy Broccoli Soup http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/creamy-broccoli-soup/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/creamy-broccoli-soup/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:55:48 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21688 1/4 c. chopped onion
1 Tbsp. butter
2 cups milk
1 – 8 oz. pkg. cream cheese
3/4 lb. Velveeta cheese, cubed
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
10 oz. broccoli, fresh or frozen
Dash of pepper

In two-quart saucepan, cook onions in butter until tender. Add milk and cream cheese, stir over medium heat until cream cheese is melted. Add remaining ingredients, heat thoroughly, stirring occasionally. Makes five – one cup servings. Delicious.

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Golden Carrot Pudding http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/golden-carrot-pudding-2/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/golden-carrot-pudding-2/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:54:38 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21686 1 c. shredded raw carrots
2 c. dry bread crumbs
1/2 c. crushed pineapple, drained
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 c. sugar
1/4 c. pineapple juice
1/4 c. melted butter
4 eggs

Mix carrots, crumbs, pineapple, cinnamon and juice. Place in buttered baking dish. Beat eggs until lemon colored; stir in sugar and melted butter. Pour over carrot mixture and stir thoroughly. Bake at 350° for 45 minutes or until firm. A deep baking dish will take longer. Serve warm or cold with whipped cream or topping. Serves six.

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Oven Fried Broccoli Flowerets http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/oven-fried-broccoli-flowerets-2/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/oven-fried-broccoli-flowerets-2/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:53:32 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21684 (Serve the bite-sized morsels of broccoli straight from the oven.)

1/2 c. dairy sour cream
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
1 bunch broccoli, cut into flowerets with 1-inch stems
1/2 tsp. garlic salt
1/2 c. crushed cornflakes

In bowl, stir together sour cream, Worcestershire sauce and garlic salt. Dip broccoli flowerets into sour cream mixture, then roll in crushed cornflakes to coat. Place on greased baking sheet. Bake in 400° oven 20 minutes or until tender – crisp. Serve warm. Makes about 48 appetizers.

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Broccoli Salad http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/broccoli-salad-5/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/broccoli-salad-5/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:52:17 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21682 1/2 c. mayonnaise or salad dressing
1 Tbsp. sugar
1 Tbsp. cider vinegar
1 med. head broccoli, trimmed and coarsely chopped
1 small onion, chopped
1/2 c. raisins
10 slices bacon, cooked, drained and crumbled

In medium bowl using wire whisk, beat together mayonnaise, sugar and vinegar. Add broccoli, onion and raisins; toss until well coated. Cover and refrigerate at least three hours to blend flavors, stirring occasionally. Garnish with bacon. Makes about 2 1/2 cups or about five servings.

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Broccoli Rice Casserole http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/broccoli-rice-casserole-2/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/broccoli-rice-casserole-2/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:51:16 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21680 1/2 stick margarine (or butter)
1 small onion, minced
1 pkg. frozen chopped broccoli
1/4 c. water
1 can cream of chicken soup
1/2 c. Cheese Whiz (or Velveeta or other cheese, cut up
1 c. Minute Rice

Sauté onion in butter or margarine. Cook broccoli as usual. Mix other ingredients together and mix in broccoli and onions. Bake in 350° oven for 45 minutes. Crushed cracker crumbs make a nice topping.

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Blue Cheese Apple Slaw http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/blue-cheese-apple-slaw-2/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/blue-cheese-apple-slaw-2/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:50:19 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21678 2 Delicious apples
1 qt. finely shredded cabbage
1/2 c. chopped, pitted dates
1/4 c. chopped green pepper
2 Tbsp. chopped green onion
Blue cheese dressing

Core and thinly slice apples. Combine with the cabbage, dates, green pepper and onion. Add dressing and mix thoroughly. Makes six – eight servings.

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Cauliflower Slaw http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/cauliflower-slaw/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/cauliflower-slaw/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:48:52 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21676 4 c. cauliflower flowerettes (1 small head)
1/2 c. chopped green pepper
2/3 c. dairy sour cream
1/4 c. chopped onion
1 tsp. dry mustard
3 Tbsp. mayonnaise or salad dressing
1 tsp. sugar
Few drops bottled hot pepper sauce
2 medium tomatoes, seeded and chopped

In a large bowl, combine cauliflower, green pepper and onion. Stir together sour cream, mayonnaise, mustard, sugar and hot pepper sauce. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Gently stir dressing into vegetable mixture. Cover and chill several hours. Just before serving, carefully stir in tomatoes. Makes 8 – 10 servings.

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Greek Salad http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/greek-salad-2/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/greek-salad-2/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:47:41 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21673 1 head cauliflower
1 bunch broccoli
1 lb. fresh mushrooms
1 10 oz. can black olives (pitted)
1 10 oz. jar of Spanish pimento olives
1 basket cherry tomatoes
1/2 lb. feta cheese
1 can artichoke hearts
Marinade:
1 c. vinegar
1 1/2 c. vegetable oil
1 tsp. garlic salt
1 tsp. pepper
1 Tbsp. sugar or 2 packets Equal
1 Tbsp. dill weed
1 tsp. salt
1 Tbsp. Accent

Cut all vegetables into bite-size pieces. Slice olives. Mix together vegetables and marinade in large bowl that has a sealing cover and refrigerate 24 hours. Approximately 12 servings. To make this your very own recipe, leave out or add any other vegetables you like. Any of the above vegetables or the cheese can be left out if it not to your liking.

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5 To-Dos Before Retiring http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/5-to-dos-before-retiring/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/5-to-dos-before-retiring/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 19:00:03 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?guid=242c349d29ec268248454b1933cec5f0 After decades of hard work and saving, you finally enter your golden years. If you’re gearing up to retire this year, here are five tasks to keep in mind, from spending cash to spending time.

Create a budget and spending plan. Before you enter retirement, fix a money amount you can part with regularly. This will help you compare what income you expect after working with your anticipated living expenses, and provide a framework for how much you need to live comfortably in retirement.

Experts estimate that most retirees need at least 70% of pre-retirement income to maintain a familiar standard of living. Lower-income earners may require 90% or more.

Think about socking away funds to prepare for emergency expenses that your standard retirement budget may not cover, such as unforeseen health-care costs, auto repairs or property maintenance.

Try living off of your expected budget for at least six months prior to retirement: Test-driving your plan will also help you identify gaps or expenses you missed.

Determine when to enroll in Medicare and take Social Security benefits. The current eligibility age for Medicare is 65. It’s important to sign up for Medicare as soon as you are eligible, or begin submitting the appropriate paperwork as much as three months in advance.

Failure to sign up before 65 may cost you fees and penalties. Evaluate premiums, copays and co-insurance to help determine what you potentially pay out of pocket.

Medicare may not cover every health-care expense. Look into the program’s supplemental policies, aka Medigap, which private insurance companies sell. A long-term care insurance policy can also help you pay for hospice care, assisted living and other expenses Medicare may not cover.

Determining when to begin Social Security benefits can vary depending on your situation. Many retirees begin benefits as soon as eligible, requiring the money immediately to supplement income during retirement; others can delay.

Taking Social Security before your full retirement age (FRA) may reduce your benefits. Your FRA is 66 if you were born between 1943 and 1959, and 67 if you were born in 1960 or later.

If you don’t need the cash flow, you may want to delay benefits until after you turn 62, when you can take early benefits (which are lower than at FRA). Your benefit amount can then grow 8% annually. If married, you may be able to collect spousal benefits, which are based on your spouse’s work records. Consult a financial advisor to determine your best approach.

Roll your 401(k) over into an individual retirement account (IRA). Accessing your savings in retirement can be tougher if you keep the money in your employer’s 401(k) plan. Rolling your dollars into an IRA allows for easier access and distributions – often even a monthly transfer to your bank account, a kind of monthly replacement paycheck.

Rolling your savings over into an IRA might also save money, as many 401(k)s carry administration fees when you take out money. Putting your savings into an IRA that your existing financial advisor manages allows for more streamlined distribution planning, since all of the assets will be in one place.

Develop a long-term investment plan. Fear for your savings need not prevent you from growth investing to keep up with rising costs.

Many retirees stash portfolios in bonds, but over time inflation can erode the purchasing power of such investments’ yield. A well-diversified portfolio that includes a balance of stocks and bonds can often help your nest egg last throughout your retirement years (which might span three decades). Consistently monitor your investment allocation – it may change over time depending on your age, retirement goals and financial circumstances.

Taxes influence how you spend assets during retirement. Your best strategy is probably to first dip into taxable assets (such as profits from the sale of investments) and allow tax-deferred assets – such as funds in retirement accounts — to continue to grow and compound.

Note: Most tax-sheltered plans require that you start required minimum distribution (RMD) withdrawals no later than age 70½.

Decide how to spend time. This plays a huge, sometimes surprising role in determining your financial condition in retirement. Your plans and expenses will vary in the months ahead depending on your interests, hobbies and activities.

Some retirees, for example, opt to stay close to home and spend more time with family. Others travel around the world. Knowing how you will allocate free time and dollars goes a long way toward keeping you on your golden years’ budget.

Retirement can be expensive, especially if you have no plan.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Derec Mieden is an associate consultant with Wipfli Hewins Investment Advisors LLC in Wausau, Wis.

Hewins Financial Advisors, LLC d/b/a Wipfli Hewins Investment Advisors, LLC (“Hewins”) is an investment advisor registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. Hewins is a proud affiliate of Wipfli, LLP. Information pertaining to Hewins’ advisory operations, services, and fees is set forth in Hewins’ current ADV Part 2A, copies of which are available upon request or at www.adviserinfo.sec.gov.

The views expressed by the author are the author’s alone and do not necessarily represent the views of Hewins or its affiliates. The information contained in any third-party resource cited herein is not owned or controlled by Hewins, and Hewins does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of any information that may be found in such resources. Links to any third-party resource are provided as a courtesy for reference only and are not intended to be, and do not act as, an endorsement by Hewins of the third party or any of its content or use of its content. The standard information provided in this blog is for general purposes only and should not be construed as, or used as a substitute for, financial, investment, or other professional advice. If you have questions regarding your financial situation, you should consult your financial planner, investment advisor, attorney or other professional. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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After decades of hard work and saving, you finally enter your golden years. If you’re gearing up to retire this year, here are five tasks to keep in mind, from spending cash to spending time.

Create a budget and spending plan. Before you enter retirement, fix a money amount you can part with regularly. This will help you compare what income you expect after working with your anticipated living expenses, and provide a framework for how much you need to live comfortably in retirement.

Experts estimate that most retirees need at least 70% of pre-retirement income to maintain a familiar standard of living. Lower-income earners may require 90% or more.

Think about socking away funds to prepare for emergency expenses that your standard retirement budget may not cover, such as unforeseen health-care costs, auto repairs or property maintenance.

Try living off of your expected budget for at least six months prior to retirement: Test-driving your plan will also help you identify gaps or expenses you missed.

Determine when to enroll in Medicare and take Social Security benefits. The current eligibility age for Medicare is 65. It’s important to sign up for Medicare as soon as you are eligible, or begin submitting the appropriate paperwork as much as three months in advance.

Failure to sign up before 65 may cost you fees and penalties. Evaluate premiums, copays and co-insurance to help determine what you potentially pay out of pocket.

Medicare may not cover every health-care expense. Look into the program’s supplemental policies, aka Medigap, which private insurance companies sell. A long-term care insurance policy can also help you pay for hospice care, assisted living and other expenses Medicare may not cover.

Determining when to begin Social Security benefits can vary depending on your situation. Many retirees begin benefits as soon as eligible, requiring the money immediately to supplement income during retirement; others can delay.

Taking Social Security before your full retirement age (FRA) may reduce your benefits. Your FRA is 66 if you were born between 1943 and 1959, and 67 if you were born in 1960 or later.

If you don’t need the cash flow, you may want to delay benefits until after you turn 62, when you can take early benefits (which are lower than at FRA). Your benefit amount can then grow 8% annually. If married, you may be able to collect spousal benefits, which are based on your spouse’s work records. Consult a financial advisor to determine your best approach.

Roll your 401(k) over into an individual retirement account (IRA). Accessing your savings in retirement can be tougher if you keep the money in your employer’s 401(k) plan. Rolling your dollars into an IRA allows for easier access and distributions – often even a monthly transfer to your bank account, a kind of monthly replacement paycheck.

Rolling your savings over into an IRA might also save money, as many 401(k)s carry administration fees when you take out money. Putting your savings into an IRA that your existing financial advisor manages allows for more streamlined distribution planning, since all of the assets will be in one place.

Develop a long-term investment plan. Fear for your savings need not prevent you from growth investing to keep up with rising costs.

Many retirees stash portfolios in bonds, but over time inflation can erode the purchasing power of such investments’ yield. A well-diversified portfolio that includes a balance of stocks and bonds can often help your nest egg last throughout your retirement years (which might span three decades). Consistently monitor your investment allocation – it may change over time depending on your age, retirement goals and financial circumstances.

Taxes influence how you spend assets during retirement. Your best strategy is probably to first dip into taxable assets (such as profits from the sale of investments) and allow tax-deferred assets – such as funds in retirement accounts — to continue to grow and compound.

Note: Most tax-sheltered plans require that you start required minimum distribution (RMD) withdrawals no later than age 70½.

Decide how to spend time. This plays a huge, sometimes surprising role in determining your financial condition in retirement. Your plans and expenses will vary in the months ahead depending on your interests, hobbies and activities.

Some retirees, for example, opt to stay close to home and spend more time with family. Others travel around the world. Knowing how you will allocate free time and dollars goes a long way toward keeping you on your golden years’ budget.

Retirement can be expensive, especially if you have no plan.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Derec Mieden is an associate consultant with Wipfli Hewins Investment Advisors LLC in Wausau, Wis.

Hewins Financial Advisors, LLC d/b/a Wipfli Hewins Investment Advisors, LLC (“Hewins”) is an investment advisor registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. Hewins is a proud affiliate of Wipfli, LLP. Information pertaining to Hewins’ advisory operations, services, and fees is set forth in Hewins’ current ADV Part 2A, copies of which are available upon request or at www.adviserinfo.sec.gov.

The views expressed by the author are the author’s alone and do not necessarily represent the views of Hewins or its affiliates. The information contained in any third-party resource cited herein is not owned or controlled by Hewins, and Hewins does not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of any information that may be found in such resources. Links to any third-party resource are provided as a courtesy for reference only and are not intended to be, and do not act as, an endorsement by Hewins of the third party or any of its content or use of its content. The standard information provided in this blog is for general purposes only and should not be construed as, or used as a substitute for, financial, investment, or other professional advice. If you have questions regarding your financial situation, you should consult your financial planner, investment advisor, attorney or other professional. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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Signs of a Good Money Track http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/signs-of-a-good-money-track/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/signs-of-a-good-money-track/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 16:00:04 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?guid=1089ba0d5f1749bfac2b01d606eaab09 A solid financial plan can help reduce stress in your life, but how do can you tell when you’re sticking to a plan? Here are some signs of progress, from your physical comfort to your spending and savings habits.

Comfort with your budget. If anything keeps you up at night, it’s not your finances. A budget constitutes a first building block toward solid financial footing; using it monthly to guide your spending keeps you on track.

Many people fear discussing finances, perhaps embarrassed from a ton of debt or skimpy savings. They put off meeting with a financial planner, investment advisor or estate planning attorney – inattention that can create a dominoes’ fall of money trouble.

Your comfortable budget makes spending easy. You spend intelligently and don’t waste your money.

Guilt-free splurging on special occasions. Almost everyone spends dizzying amounts at certain moments in life. Maybe you feel guilty after buying more car than you can afford or dropping more on a dress for a big party. These things happen and you probably rein in after.

For a birthday, anniversary or other special event, you can feel free to spend more than an everyday amount to celebrate. Build room in your budget for these expenditures.

A little planning also gives you flexibility to buy occasional items you really want. Saving money to buy a new iPhone or top-of-the-line running shoes feels far more rewarding than going broke on impulse spending.

Supporting your favorite charities. You probably have favorite nonprofits. You can give to these organizations and actually feel comfortable and empowered parting with the money.

Your balances grow. Consistently spending less than you earn year lets you build a financial snowball that gets bigger each year. You continue to save and invest for your future.

Sometimes future throws you a curve: an illness or a surprise house repair. When handling an unplanned problem the last thing you worry about is your finances. Your rainy day fund lets you focus on the issues at hand.

You don’t need your job. Your emergency fund of three to six months’ expenses also gives you financial flexibility if you lose your paycheck: You can patiently job search and don’t need to jump at the first offer just to pay bills.

Set your budget, stick to it and live within your means and work becomes far more enjoyable.

Clear understanding of your financial goals. You know your three or four major financial goals and whether you worked with a financial planner or investment advisor or created a plan on your own, you know how much you need to save or invest to reach your goals.

Discipline with credit cards. Plastic can be the floodgate for poor personal financial decisions. You pay your cards off each month and use the cards’ rewards points for your benefit, whether in the form of cash back, airline miles or gift cards.

401(k) contribution above the match. Your company offers a matching contribution to your 401(k) workplace retirement plan of probably around 5% of your income. You did the math and realize that your contribution and your employer’s combined won’t meet your retirement goals. You therefore kick in more than the match and work to max your 401(k) contributions.

This year, the Internal Revenue Service allows you to contribute up to $18,000 in a 401(k); if you’re 50 or older, you can kick in an additional $6,000. Total contributions from both you and your employer can’t exceed $53,000 ($59,000 if you’re 50 or older).

You also know that putting money into your retirement accounts, savings and other accounts before you spend a penny sets up financial success.

Controlled debt. With discipline and thrift you paid off your car and student loans and take down your credit card balances every month. Even if you now still carry some debt, such as a mortgage, knowing that red ink is under control gives you peace of mind.

Your mortgage likely remains your biggest monthly expense – yet you agree with conventional wisdom that advises paying off other, higher-interest debt first.

Facing college costs confidently. Higher education creeps closer for your kids every day and you counter with a plan: contributing to a 529 to help pay for tuition, tweaking your family budget to funnel more of your income toward education and helping your children earn scholarships.

Correct insurance. You know your homeowner’s, auto and life insurance provide the appropriate coverage for your financial situation. You don’t waste money with unnecessary insurers – and, conversely, become stingy with your coverage and leave yourself financially vulnerable.

Updated estate plan. You met with an estate attorney and completed a will or trust along with powers of attorney and health-care documents in case you become incapacitated and can’t make your own decisions. You also told family or friends where to find these documents.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Andrew Comstock, CFA, is president and chief investment officer of Castlebar Asset Management in Leawood, Kan. The Castlebar Asset Management Blog has weekly posts on financial planning topics.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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A solid financial plan can help reduce stress in your life, but how do can you tell when you’re sticking to a plan? Here are some signs of progress, from your physical comfort to your spending and savings habits.

Comfort with your budget. If anything keeps you up at night, it’s not your finances. A budget constitutes a first building block toward solid financial footing; using it monthly to guide your spending keeps you on track.

Many people fear discussing finances, perhaps embarrassed from a ton of debt or skimpy savings. They put off meeting with a financial planner, investment advisor or estate planning attorney – inattention that can create a dominoes’ fall of money trouble.

Your comfortable budget makes spending easy. You spend intelligently and don’t waste your money.

Guilt-free splurging on special occasions. Almost everyone spends dizzying amounts at certain moments in life. Maybe you feel guilty after buying more car than you can afford or dropping more on a dress for a big party. These things happen and you probably rein in after.

For a birthday, anniversary or other special event, you can feel free to spend more than an everyday amount to celebrate. Build room in your budget for these expenditures.

A little planning also gives you flexibility to buy occasional items you really want. Saving money to buy a new iPhone or top-of-the-line running shoes feels far more rewarding than going broke on impulse spending.

Supporting your favorite charities. You probably have favorite nonprofits. You can give to these organizations and actually feel comfortable and empowered parting with the money.

Your balances grow. Consistently spending less than you earn year lets you build a financial snowball that gets bigger each year. You continue to save and invest for your future.

Sometimes future throws you a curve: an illness or a surprise house repair. When handling an unplanned problem the last thing you worry about is your finances. Your rainy day fund lets you focus on the issues at hand.

You don’t need your job. Your emergency fund of three to six months’ expenses also gives you financial flexibility if you lose your paycheck: You can patiently job search and don’t need to jump at the first offer just to pay bills.

Set your budget, stick to it and live within your means and work becomes far more enjoyable.

Clear understanding of your financial goals. You know your three or four major financial goals and whether you worked with a financial planner or investment advisor or created a plan on your own, you know how much you need to save or invest to reach your goals.

Discipline with credit cards. Plastic can be the floodgate for poor personal financial decisions. You pay your cards off each month and use the cards’ rewards points for your benefit, whether in the form of cash back, airline miles or gift cards.

401(k) contribution above the match. Your company offers a matching contribution to your 401(k) workplace retirement plan of probably around 5% of your income. You did the math and realize that your contribution and your employer’s combined won’t meet your retirement goals. You therefore kick in more than the match and work to max your 401(k) contributions.

This year, the Internal Revenue Service allows you to contribute up to $18,000 in a 401(k); if you’re 50 or older, you can kick in an additional $6,000. Total contributions from both you and your employer can’t exceed $53,000 ($59,000 if you’re 50 or older).

You also know that putting money into your retirement accounts, savings and other accounts before you spend a penny sets up financial success.

Controlled debt. With discipline and thrift you paid off your car and student loans and take down your credit card balances every month. Even if you now still carry some debt, such as a mortgage, knowing that red ink is under control gives you peace of mind.

Your mortgage likely remains your biggest monthly expense – yet you agree with conventional wisdom that advises paying off other, higher-interest debt first.

Facing college costs confidently. Higher education creeps closer for your kids every day and you counter with a plan: contributing to a 529 to help pay for tuition, tweaking your family budget to funnel more of your income toward education and helping your children earn scholarships.

Correct insurance. You know your homeowner’s, auto and life insurance provide the appropriate coverage for your financial situation. You don’t waste money with unnecessary insurers – and, conversely, become stingy with your coverage and leave yourself financially vulnerable.

Updated estate plan. You met with an estate attorney and completed a will or trust along with powers of attorney and health-care documents in case you become incapacitated and can’t make your own decisions. You also told family or friends where to find these documents.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Andrew Comstock, CFA, is president and chief investment officer of Castlebar Asset Management in Leawood, Kan. The Castlebar Asset Management Blog has weekly posts on financial planning topics.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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LP woman charged with embezzling nearly $1.3 million from vet clinics http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/lp-woman-charged-with-embezzling-nearly-1-3-million-from-vet-clinics/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/lp-woman-charged-with-embezzling-nearly-1-3-million-from-vet-clinics/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 13:50:35 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21659 A 43-year-old Long Prairie woman was charged by the Stearns County Attorney’s Office with eight counts of felony theft in early May, for embezzling nearly $1.3 million from Minnesota Veterinary Associates, since 2008.

Sherry Anderson worked in the accounting department, doing payroll and deposits for the company’s five clinic locations including Melrose, Albany, Little Falls, Sauk Centre and Rice.

Anderson worked for the business from March 2001 through February 2014, and was responsible for collecting payments from the clinics, monitoring and recording customer payments and preparing and making deposits at the bank.

The criminal complaint said that during a time period  earlier this year, when Anderson was on medical leave, another employee discovered she had been allegedly paying herself more than her earned salary by using a higher rate of pay, entering extra hours or giving herself more time off than she was allowed to earn.

The employee, who had gone through Anderson’s payroll history to calculate the overage, allegedly told officers from the Melrose Police Department that Anderson had talked about loaning money to others, was driving new vehicles every six months, went on big vacations a couple of times a year and talked about college funds she had for her children.

The criminal complaint said Anderson kept portions of cash paid by customers to the business, and used floater checks to cover the discrepancies.

Another co-worker, who would sometimes help in payroll and preparing deposits, allegedly told officers that Anderson wanted to do the payroll and deposits herself and would accuse the co-worker of doing the reports incorrectly.

The total amount of money reportedly embezzled through deposits and payroll by Anderson between May 2008 through March 2014, was $759,317.17. For the period between July 2010 and March 2014, the amount was calculated at $533,202.88.

In seven of the eight counts for periods from July 1, 2010 and Dec. 31, 2013, Anderson is accused of taking more than $35,000 and for the eighth, for a time period between Jan. 1, 2014 and March 1, 2014, more than $5,000.

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Buffer zone info meeting set for Sauk Centre July 9 http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/buffer-zone-info-meeting-set-for-sauk-centre-july-9/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/buffer-zone-info-meeting-set-for-sauk-centre-july-9/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 13:48:22 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21657 The Minnesota Corn Growers Association (MCGA) will be holding six “What you Need to Know” district meetings throughout the state, including one in Sauk Centre, to provide farmers with important updates on Minnesota’s buffer law.

Also expected to be covered are proposed changes to federal ethanol policy, conservation programs and other topics that impact the future of agriculture in Minnesota.

The meeting in Sauk Centre will be Thursday, July 9 from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. at ElmerZ Restaurant and Event Center, 1225 Timberlane Drive.

Each meeting is free to attend and open to all farmers. Refreshments will be served.

In addition to MCGA staff, farmers will hear from local Soil and Water Conservation District personnel and other ag professionals.

“Farmers have a lot of questions about changes to Minnesota’s buffer laws after the recently completed legislative session,” said Bruce Peterson, a farmer in Northfield and MCGA president. “These meetings are an opportunity to get those questions answered, and cover other important items such as ethanol and the Environmental Protection Agency’s attempt to slash the Renewable Fuel Standard.”

Additional meetings will be held July 8 n Red Lake Falls, July 9 in Fergus Falls, July 22 in Fairmont and Redwood Falls and July 23 in Austin.

`For more information, visit www.mncorn.org or call the MCGA office at (952) 233-0333.

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Stocks Up, Bonds Down? http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/stocks-up-bonds-down/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/stocks-up-bonds-down/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 13:00:03 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?guid=973f740e8ed377d65fe7120440056efc Since the financial crisis, when both stocks and bond prices took a pounding, the normal pattern returned: Stocks zig when bonds zag. That usually meant that trouble in the world tanked stocks and buoyed bonds, particularly Treasuries. Nowadays, though, stocks and bonds may end up trading places.

Currently, activity is intensifying in the bond market, amid the prospect of rising rates, which should lead to lower bond prices. For stocks, a shrinking supply of shares outstanding could bring higher prices. To be sure, other forces might emerge to shatter any such trends, but for now they are worth taking into consideration when investing.

In the bond market, traders were buying during the price dips through January of this year. For the past four months, they have been selling on the upticks. Volatility is high.

For non-traders, this means interest rates are going higher and bond values are going lower. (When rates go up, prices go down, and vice versa.) The five-year U.S. Treasury rate is at 1.63% lately, the high end of a range that began two years ago. The widely traded benchmark 10-year Treasury, at 2.34%, is headed back toward its 2.59% level from mid-year 2014. In Germany, the 10-year government bond rate has climbed to about 0.77% from around 0.07% in the past few months.

Bond traders are momentum traders. Momentum begets momentum in the bond market, more so than in the stock market. Bond traders are betting rates are going meaningfully higher, especially for shorter-term issues.

That’s for two reasons: 1) central bank stimulus, through extensive bond buying called quantitative easing (QE), held rates artificially low, and 2) the U.S. and European economies are gaining strength. Fundamental economic strength lifts rates as return on invested capital rises, demand for capital increases and lenders are able to charge more.
 
The bond market often leads the equity market. In this case, the bond market is beginning to signal a normalization of the interest rate environment, driven by fundamental strength in many of the developed world economies.

Meanwhile, stock supply is shrinking. Absent any other dynamic, such as an international crisis or a major economic debacle, this trend should put upward pressure of share prices. At a fundamental level, stock market valuation is set at the equilibrium price that balances demand with supply. Acquisitions, bankruptcies, going private and stock buybacks are overwhelming new stock issuance through initial public offerings. Thus far in 2015, the market is flat, after a long bull run.

At our firm, we regularly update our database of roughly 3,400 stocks. In the most recent update cycle covering the past year, we removed a net 178 companies from our database as they are no longer publically traded. This 178-company departure is a surprisingly large reduction of more than 5%.
 
Many of the companies are household names that have been public for years. The three largest announced acquisitions were cable colossus Comcast’s $71 billion buy of Time Warner Cable, telecom giant AT&T’s (T) $67 billion purchase of DirecTV and drug maker Activis’ (ACT) $66 billion acquisition of Allergan. Other long-standing companies to disappear include Wellpoint, merged with health insurer Anthem (ANTM), and supermarket chain Safeway, which went went private.
 
Research firm FactSet tracks the aggregate common shares outstanding in the Standard & Poor’s 500 using a rolling universe and also a universe of only the companies that were in the index throughout the period reviewed. It may provide the best indication of absolute U.S. stock share count. In the past five years, the fixed universe of S&P 500 stocks has diminished by about 5.7%.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:unnamed-1.jpg

On the demand side, cumulative flows into U.S. equity mutual funds and exchange-traded funds since 2007 through February 2015 have been slightly positive, with the growth coming from institutions like pension plans. The $661 billion of retail outflows were offset by $665 billion of institutional investor inflows. Who is right, individual investors or the institutions? Well, at times, market observers have called insiders and institutions “smart money.”

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:unnamed.jpg

It is difficult to equate a supply contraction relative to a constant demand into market aggregate price impact. The high-level supply/demand statistics show demand has generally exceeded supply, which leads to higher prices. Additionally, the demand has come from insiders and institutions via stock buybacks and mergers and acquisitions. U.S. merger and acquisition activity hit $1.53 trillion in 2014, up 51.4% from 2013 and near all-time high levels.

Trading volume tends to lighten in the summer months and global-macro uncertainty can create significant volatility. It is possible that the Greek debt situation is just a distraction and markets won’t be able to rally until there is clarity on the Federal Reserve rate liftoff. If the underlying shrinking supply and steady demand stock backdrop remains in place, the market should prove resilient over time.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Nicholas Atkeson and Andrew Houghton are the founding partners of Delta Investment Management, a registered investment advisory firm in San Francisco, and authors of the new book, Win by Not Losing: A Disciplined Approach To Building And Protecting Your Wealth In The Stock Market By Managing Your RiskAdditional market commentary and investment advice is available via their websites at www.deltaim.com and www.deltawealthaccelerator.com

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Since the financial crisis, when both stocks and bond prices took a pounding, the normal pattern returned: Stocks zig when bonds zag. That usually meant that trouble in the world tanked stocks and buoyed bonds, particularly Treasuries. Nowadays, though, stocks and bonds may end up trading places.

Currently, activity is intensifying in the bond market, amid the prospect of rising rates, which should lead to lower bond prices. For stocks, a shrinking supply of shares outstanding could bring higher prices. To be sure, other forces might emerge to shatter any such trends, but for now they are worth taking into consideration when investing.

In the bond market, traders were buying during the price dips through January of this year. For the past four months, they have been selling on the upticks. Volatility is high.

For non-traders, this means interest rates are going higher and bond values are going lower. (When rates go up, prices go down, and vice versa.) The five-year U.S. Treasury rate is at 1.63% lately, the high end of a range that began two years ago. The widely traded benchmark 10-year Treasury, at 2.34%, is headed back toward its 2.59% level from mid-year 2014. In Germany, the 10-year government bond rate has climbed to about 0.77% from around 0.07% in the past few months.

Bond traders are momentum traders. Momentum begets momentum in the bond market, more so than in the stock market. Bond traders are betting rates are going meaningfully higher, especially for shorter-term issues.

That’s for two reasons: 1) central bank stimulus, through extensive bond buying called quantitative easing (QE), held rates artificially low, and 2) the U.S. and European economies are gaining strength. Fundamental economic strength lifts rates as return on invested capital rises, demand for capital increases and lenders are able to charge more.
 
The bond market often leads the equity market. In this case, the bond market is beginning to signal a normalization of the interest rate environment, driven by fundamental strength in many of the developed world economies.

Meanwhile, stock supply is shrinking. Absent any other dynamic, such as an international crisis or a major economic debacle, this trend should put upward pressure of share prices. At a fundamental level, stock market valuation is set at the equilibrium price that balances demand with supply. Acquisitions, bankruptcies, going private and stock buybacks are overwhelming new stock issuance through initial public offerings. Thus far in 2015, the market is flat, after a long bull run.

At our firm, we regularly update our database of roughly 3,400 stocks. In the most recent update cycle covering the past year, we removed a net 178 companies from our database as they are no longer publically traded. This 178-company departure is a surprisingly large reduction of more than 5%.
 
Many of the companies are household names that have been public for years. The three largest announced acquisitions were cable colossus Comcast’s $71 billion buy of Time Warner Cable, telecom giant AT&T’s (T) $67 billion purchase of DirecTV and drug maker Activis’ (ACT) $66 billion acquisition of Allergan. Other long-standing companies to disappear include Wellpoint, merged with health insurer Anthem (ANTM), and supermarket chain Safeway, which went went private.
 
Research firm FactSet tracks the aggregate common shares outstanding in the Standard & Poor’s 500 using a rolling universe and also a universe of only the companies that were in the index throughout the period reviewed. It may provide the best indication of absolute U.S. stock share count. In the past five years, the fixed universe of S&P 500 stocks has diminished by about 5.7%.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:unnamed-1.jpg

On the demand side, cumulative flows into U.S. equity mutual funds and exchange-traded funds since 2007 through February 2015 have been slightly positive, with the growth coming from institutions like pension plans. The $661 billion of retail outflows were offset by $665 billion of institutional investor inflows. Who is right, individual investors or the institutions? Well, at times, market observers have called insiders and institutions “smart money.”

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:unnamed.jpg

It is difficult to equate a supply contraction relative to a constant demand into market aggregate price impact. The high-level supply/demand statistics show demand has generally exceeded supply, which leads to higher prices. Additionally, the demand has come from insiders and institutions via stock buybacks and mergers and acquisitions. U.S. merger and acquisition activity hit $1.53 trillion in 2014, up 51.4% from 2013 and near all-time high levels.

Trading volume tends to lighten in the summer months and global-macro uncertainty can create significant volatility. It is possible that the Greek debt situation is just a distraction and markets won’t be able to rally until there is clarity on the Federal Reserve rate liftoff. If the underlying shrinking supply and steady demand stock backdrop remains in place, the market should prove resilient over time.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Nicholas Atkeson and Andrew Houghton are the founding partners of Delta Investment Management, a registered investment advisory firm in San Francisco, and authors of the new book, Win by Not Losing: A Disciplined Approach To Building And Protecting Your Wealth In The Stock Market By Managing Your RiskAdditional market commentary and investment advice is available via their websites at www.deltaim.com and www.deltawealthaccelerator.com

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Frances Sames, 90 http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/frances-sames-90/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/07/frances-sames-90/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 11:22:56 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21653 Frances   Sames, 90

Frances M. Sames, age 90 of Melrose, died Tuesday, June 30, 2015 at the St. Cloud Hospital in St. Cloud, Minnesota.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, July 3 at St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church in St. Rosa with Rev. Daniel Walz officiating. A private entombment will be held at a later date at Sacred Heart Cemetery in Freeport.
Visitation will be from 10 to 11 a.m. Friday at the church.
Frances Monica Humpolik was born March 7, 1925 in Minneapolis, Minnesota to Francis and Rose Humpolik. She was united in marriage to Robert Sames on August 12, 1946 in Mound, Minnesota. Since 1951 the couple resided in the Melrose area, for the past 45 years at Birch Lake. She was a member of St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church in St. Rosa.  Frances enjoyed reading, traveling, playing cards, especially bridge and cribbage, and loved living at the lake.
Survivors include her two daughters, Lee (Jim) Uphoff of Greenwald and Chris Sames of Nisswa; two grandchildren, Bruce (Carmen) Uphoff of San Marcos, California and Kristen Uphoff of Greenwald; great-grandchildren, Michelle Uphoff, Savannah Finken, and Dominic Finken; and many nieces, nephews, relatives and friends.
Frances was preceded in death by her husband, Robert Sames on December 1, 2004; parents; and grandsons, John Uphoff and Robbie Uphoff.
Serving as casket bearers will be Lee Uphoff, Jim Uphoff, Chris Sames, Chuck Ostberg, Bruce Uphoff, and Kristen Uphoff. Cross bearers will be Savannah Finken and Michelle Uphoff and scripture bearer will be Dominic Finken. Honorary bearers will be Lilliana and Luis Diego Calzada R and Frances’ Coffee Clutch.
In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred.

Arrangements were made with Patton-Schad Funeral & Cremation Services of Melrose.

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Parable for Roth Conversion http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/parable-for-roth-conversion/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/parable-for-roth-conversion/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 19:30:02 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?guid=0db442d79cea5d8a1ba1af95c81b55d0 Many boomers keep most savings in either 401(k) plans or traditional individual retirement accounts. If you’re in this generation, born between 1946 and 1964 and with a few working years remaining before retirement, consider converting your IRA to a Roth.

With a traditional IRA, you get a tax break on your contributions in the current year and in retirement your withdrawals incur income tax. With a Roth IRA, you get no income tax deduction on plan contributions, but your investment earnings and withdrawals incur no income taxes.

Roth IRAs do come with restrictions. Your contributions are limited to $5,500 a year ($6,500 if you’re 50 or older), but if your modified adjusted gross income is too high in 2015 ($193,000 for married, filing jointly, and $131,000 for single) you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA. However, there are no income limits that prevent any amount of Roth IRA conversions. You must be at least age 59½ when you begin taking withdrawals from the Roth and you can’t withdraw money until you participate in at least one Roth IRA plan for at least five years.

Though most tax-sheltered plans require you start required minimum distribution (RMD) withdrawals no later than age 70½, Roth IRAs do not require RMDs.

Perhaps the easiest way to think of the advantages of such a conversion is to imagine you are a farmer. It’s early March, and you hear a knock at the front porch door.

“Hello,” says the man at the door, “I’m from the Internal Revenue Service and I’m here to help you. The federal government is experimenting with a new tax system. We can go right now to your barn and take the physical weight of your seed corn that you plan to plant next month. I will then tax you on its value in 2015.”

“Its value is $300,000,” you say.

“If you take that choice,” the man adds, “no matter how much corn you grow on your farm now and in the years ahead, there will be no tax after 2015 for the next three generations.”

You stand there in silence, trying to understand. The IRS man continues: “I know that farmers are very conservative. You probably don’t want to try a tax system that is something different.

“If you stay with the current tax system, I will come back at the end of this year’s harvest and tax you on the value of the physical weight of the mature corn kernels, the corn cob and the stalk. In fact, I will tax you on every harvest that this farm produces as long as your family owns this farm.”

You realize that the physical weight of the corn seed right now is far less than the total weight of the corn at harvest, and that the total weight of future harvests will be enormous and will be taxed for the next 80-plus years. You tell the IRS man:

“I understand that you think that the physical weight of all this seed, held in a self-directed IRA, is worth $300,000. If I convert this to a Roth IRA, you will tax me on $300,000 and never come back. Over the next 80 years, this farm will produce $300 million worth of corn crop and my family will not pay any tax for three generations.”

You’re in a 33.33% tax bracket and convert the $300,000 in your traditional self-directed IRA to a Roth IRA and owe $100,000 from this conversion. But you buy a $300,000 combine machine for your upcoming harvest before the end of the year, place it in service, and deduct the full price, offsetting the $300,000 of taxable income from the Roth IRA conversion.

“I gladly accept your offer,” you say.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Dr. Harold Wong earned his Ph.D. in economics from UC Berkeley and passed the CPA exam in 1979. He has appeared on more than 400 television and radio programs and published numerous articles in 1,600 newspapers. He writes the column on money for The Arizona Republic, the largest daily newspaper in Arizona, where this article originally appeared in different form. Dr. Wong is a tax advisor and financial educator. He can be reached at (480) 706-0177, haroldwong1@yahoo.com, or www.drharoldwong.com.You can find much of his archived research at www.DrWongInvestorGuide.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

]]>
Many boomers keep most savings in either 401(k) plans or traditional individual retirement accounts. If you’re in this generation, born between 1946 and 1964 and with a few working years remaining before retirement, consider converting your IRA to a Roth.

With a traditional IRA, you get a tax break on your contributions in the current year and in retirement your withdrawals incur income tax. With a Roth IRA, you get no income tax deduction on plan contributions, but your investment earnings and withdrawals incur no income taxes.

Roth IRAs do come with restrictions. Your contributions are limited to $5,500 a year ($6,500 if you’re 50 or older), but if your modified adjusted gross income is too high in 2015 ($193,000 for married, filing jointly, and $131,000 for single) you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA. However, there are no income limits that prevent any amount of Roth IRA conversions. You must be at least age 59½ when you begin taking withdrawals from the Roth and you can’t withdraw money until you participate in at least one Roth IRA plan for at least five years.

Though most tax-sheltered plans require you start required minimum distribution (RMD) withdrawals no later than age 70½, Roth IRAs do not require RMDs.

Perhaps the easiest way to think of the advantages of such a conversion is to imagine you are a farmer. It’s early March, and you hear a knock at the front porch door.

“Hello,” says the man at the door, “I’m from the Internal Revenue Service and I’m here to help you. The federal government is experimenting with a new tax system. We can go right now to your barn and take the physical weight of your seed corn that you plan to plant next month. I will then tax you on its value in 2015.”

“Its value is $300,000,” you say.

“If you take that choice,” the man adds, “no matter how much corn you grow on your farm now and in the years ahead, there will be no tax after 2015 for the next three generations.”

You stand there in silence, trying to understand. The IRS man continues: “I know that farmers are very conservative. You probably don’t want to try a tax system that is something different.

“If you stay with the current tax system, I will come back at the end of this year’s harvest and tax you on the value of the physical weight of the mature corn kernels, the corn cob and the stalk. In fact, I will tax you on every harvest that this farm produces as long as your family owns this farm.”

You realize that the physical weight of the corn seed right now is far less than the total weight of the corn at harvest, and that the total weight of future harvests will be enormous and will be taxed for the next 80-plus years. You tell the IRS man:

“I understand that you think that the physical weight of all this seed, held in a self-directed IRA, is worth $300,000. If I convert this to a Roth IRA, you will tax me on $300,000 and never come back. Over the next 80 years, this farm will produce $300 million worth of corn crop and my family will not pay any tax for three generations.”

You’re in a 33.33% tax bracket and convert the $300,000 in your traditional self-directed IRA to a Roth IRA and owe $100,000 from this conversion. But you buy a $300,000 combine machine for your upcoming harvest before the end of the year, place it in service, and deduct the full price, offsetting the $300,000 of taxable income from the Roth IRA conversion.

“I gladly accept your offer,” you say.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Dr. Harold Wong earned his Ph.D. in economics from UC Berkeley and passed the CPA exam in 1979. He has appeared on more than 400 television and radio programs and published numerous articles in 1,600 newspapers. He writes the column on money for The Arizona Republic, the largest daily newspaper in Arizona, where this article originally appeared in different form. Dr. Wong is a tax advisor and financial educator. He can be reached at (480) 706-0177, haroldwong1@yahoo.com, or www.drharoldwong.com.You can find much of his archived research at www.DrWongInvestorGuide.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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Alexander DeMeo, 92 http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/alexander-demeo-92/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/alexander-demeo-92/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 18:18:12 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21643 Alexander   DeMeo, 92

Alexander "Dancing Al" DeMeo, 92, of Clarissa, MN passed away on June 27, 2015. Funeral services for Al will be held on Wednesday, July 1, 2015, 11:00 a.m., at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Clarissa with Fr. Matthew Crane officiating. Interment will be held at Darling Lutheran Cemetery, Darling Township.
Alexander Joseph DeMeo was born to Felix and Susan (Gargano) DeMeo on October 22, 1922, in Chicago, IL. He attended Washburn Trade School. Al learned his carpentry trade from his father and uncles and also learned taxidermy and barbering. He served in the Army Air Corps during World War II in China, Burma and India and was all around the world.
Al was employed by Miller Fluid Power and Flick – Reedy Corp as a master machinist. He was married to Dorothy Meyer and the lived in Illinois. Al and Dorothy had five children: Mary, Philip, Alexander F, Florence and Raymond. Al had so many accomplishments in his life, he built the model of U.S.S. Constitution, (15 ft. long, 700 lbs., with masts 15 ft. tall) a 3 ft. long stern wheel ship electronically operated from the shore. Al made a 1-6th scale model of the famed Liberty Bell. He spent many hours refitting and refurbishing the U.S.S. Silversides. His machining skills made it possible for the Silversides to look almost exactly as it did when it was on active duty during World War II. When they were having fundraisers to try to recover the only major US ship to escape to the open sea during the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S.S. St. Louis known as the "Lucky Lou". Al built a very large replica which they pulled in parades all over to help raise funds.
Al was an avid scuba diver and dancer. He and his wife Carol (Juelson) moved to Clarissa in 1989. Al had the talent to repair just about anything. If he needed a part, many times he could make it. He liked to create and machine cups, etc. He restored several old gas engines. Al purchased a beat up old 1945 Farmall A Tractor which he took completely apart and restored. However, to be unique he painted his pink, with gold rims, dark lavender wheels trimmed in black; every year this would be in the parade. You could always recognize Al when he was dancing because of his belt buckle (Al on it with flashing red lights). Besides the dance floor, you could find him dancing all summer at each area town's summer festivals. All his accomplishments are too numerous to mention them all.
Al is preceded in death by his parents; wife Dorothy, wife Carol; son Philip; 1 brother and 8 sisters.
Al is survived by his children; Mary (Mike) Conkright, Alexander F. (Janet) DeMeo, Florence DeMeo, and Raymond DeMeo; 6 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren and 1 great great granddaughter. He made many friends including Karen Munson and Spencer and Kris Hayes.
Arrangements with Iten Funeral Home – itenfuneralhome.com

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Norman Faust, 80 http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/norman-faust-80/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/norman-faust-80/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 18:17:59 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21640 Norman   Faust, 80

Norman L. Faust, 80 year old resident of rural Pierz, MN passed away Saturday, June 27, 2015 at his home. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10:30 AM on Friday, July 3, 2015 at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Pierz, with Father Ken Popp officiating. Burial will be at St. Joseph's Parish Cemetery in Pierz. Visitation will be two hours prior to the service on Friday at the church.

Norman was born at home in Lastrup, Minnesota on February 7, 1935 to the parents of Henry and Theresa (Jamma) Faust. Later the family moved just south of Genola, MN. He was a graduate of the Little Falls High School in 1954. Norman took over the family farm and farmed there the rest of his life. He liked visiting with family and friends. Norman was always willing to help others. He enjoyed helping out his cousin, Elmer many times on his farm.

Norman is survived by his sister, Darleen Blonigen of St. Martin, MN; several nieces and a nephew, Florence Schefers, Wilfred (Judy) Blonigen, Shirley (Robert) Solsrud, Nancy (Blaine) Pfeiffer, Ann (Jeffrey) Soderholm, Sharon (Chad) Geist; 13 great nieces and nephews; 4 great- great nieces and nephews.

Norman was preceded in death by his parents, Henry and Theresa Faust; and brother-in-law, Raymond Blonigen.

Arrangements are with the Shelley-Virnig Funeral Chapel in Pierz, MN (320)632-5242

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Mary Kutter, 76 http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/mary-kutter-76/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/mary-kutter-76/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 18:17:48 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21637 Mary   Kutter, 76

Mary A. Kutter, age 76 of Grey Eagle, died after complications from diabetes and heart failure on Sunday, June 28, 2015 at the St. Cloud Hospital in St. Cloud, Minnesota.

A memorial service will be held at 1:30 p.m. Friday, July 3 at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Grey Eagle with Rev. Ron Tibbetts officiating. A private interment took place Wednesday, July 1 at Lakeview Cemetery in Grey Eagle.

Mary Alice Kutter was born January 23, 1939 in Grey Eagle Township, Todd County, Minnesota to Adolph and Lillian (Harris) Kutter. She graduated from Grey Eagle High School in 1956. After graduation, she did daycare in the surrounding areas for many years. Along with daycare, she started doing secretarial work at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church. Mary never really retired from her secretarial duties at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church and Immanuel Lutheran in Farming. Mary was also a member of St. John's Ladies Aid and a Sunday School and Release Time Teacher.

Mary enjoyed doing word searches, jigsaw puzzles, cooking, and baking. She was baking bread at the age of 10 and was very good at making pies.

Survivors include her brothers, Rev. Fred Kutter of Farming, John (Beatrice "Beats") Kutter of Richmond, Roy (Sharen) Kutter of Melrose, and Wayne (Sharon "Sherry") Kutter of Grey Eagle; and many nieces and nephews.

Mary was preceded in death by her parents, Adolph and Lillian Kutter.

In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred.

Arrangements were made with Patton-Schad Funeral & Cremation Services of Grey Eagle.

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Lorrine Stangler, 73 http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/lorrine-stangler-73/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2015/06/lorrine-stangler-73/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 18:17:42 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=21634 Lorrine "Tina" L. Stangler, age 73
September 27, 1941 – June 28, 2015
of Albany
A Mass of Christian Burial celebrating the life of Lorrine "Tina" L. Stangler, age 73, of Albany, will be at 11:00 AM on Thursday, July 2, 2015 at Seven Dolors Catholic Church in Albany. Father Cletus Connors will officiate with Father Brad Jenniges will concelebrating. Her dear friend Deacon Rick Sherping will assist with the wake the evening prior, and innichment will take place in the parish cemetery. Tina passed away in comfort at the Quiet Oaks Hospice House in St. Augusta surrounded by her family Sunday morning. There will be a visitation from 4:00-8:00 PM on Wednesday, July 1, 2015 and again after 10:00 AM Thursday morning at Seven Dolors Catholic Church in Albany. Parish prayers will be at 5:00 PM followed by the Christian Mothers praying the rosary at 5:30 PM Wednesday evening at the church. Arrangements are being made with Miller-Carlin Funeral Home, Albany.

Tina was born on August 27, 1941 to Lloyd and Joyce (Berstron) Briddell in Superior, WI and named Lorrine Louise. She grew up with four siblings and graduated from their local high school. On July 15, 1961, she married Ervin Stangler in Superior, WI and their union welcomed three sons. Tina was proud to be called daughter, sister, wife, and mother and family was very important to her. She was a steady presence and very supportive of her children. She enjoyed taking care of people, helping others, and never said "no" to someone in need. Tina liked spending time on her porch, talking with friends over coffee or wine. She worked as a nursing assistant for 20 years at Mother of Mercy Campus of Care in Albany. In 1997, she underwent a life-saving liver transplant and became a strong advocate for organ donation as a result. Tina was a member of Seven Dolors Catholic Church and active in the church bazaar selling things like quilts and nice crafts at the Fancy Works stand. She belonged to the Christian Mothers, volunteered at Mother Seaton's Store in Albany, and volunteered with LifeSource, an organization the coordinates organ donation.

Tina is survived by her sons Ken (Amy) Stangler, Blaine; Mark (Carol) Stangler, St. Cloud; Dean (Lisa) Stangler, Alexandria; her siblings Tim Briddell, WI; Judy (Jerry) Zehner, WI; Laura DaRonco; WI; Gloria (Jesse) James, WI; Penny Briddell, FL; her grandchildren Amber, Austin, Robert, Amanda, Luke, Megan, Morgan; as well as many other family and friends.

She is preceded in death by her parents Lloyd and Joyce Briddell and her husband Ervin in 2014.

Tina would like to express a heartfelt "thank you" to her donor and their family for all of her added years. She became a major promoter of organ donation after receiving this special gift.

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