Dairyland Peach http://dairylandpeach.com Sauk Centre, Minnesota Fri, 19 Dec 2014 15:00:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Camry Rose David http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/camry-rose-david/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/camry-rose-david/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 15:00:40 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18739 Camry Rose David

Camry Rose David was born to Westley and Jennifer David of Freeport, December 16, 2014, at 3:44 a.m. at CentraCare Health Systems, Melrose. She weighed 7 pounds, 14 ounces and was 21 inches long.
Camry is welcomed home by siblings Bailey, 16 years old, Noah, 14 years old, Brooke, 8 years old, and Henry 1 year old.
Grandparents are Terry and Peggy Gunion of Grey Eagle, Bill and Geri David of Anoka.

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Caroline Kulzer, 76 http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/caroline-kulzer-76/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/caroline-kulzer-76/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 14:59:25 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18736 Caroline   Kulzer, 76

Caroline “Carrie” C. Kulzer age 76, of Paynesville, formerly of Richmond, died on Sunday, December 14, 2014, surrounded by her family at Koronis Manor in Paynesville. Her Memorial Mass will be 11:00 am on Monday, December 22, 2014, at St. Louis Catholic Church. Burial will be at a later date. A memorial visitation will be held on Sunday, from 4-8:00 pm at Johnson Funeral Home in Paynesville and continue one hour prior to the service at the church. www.hafh.org

Caroline Catherine Kulzer was born on May 27, 1938, in Richmond, Minnesota, the daughter of Raymond and Katherine (Kunstleben) Jonas. She grew up in Albany, MN, where she received her education. After she completed her schooling Carrie went to work as waitress in Paynesville. On September 17, 1957, Carrie was united in marriage to Donald Kulzer at St. Martin Catholic Church in St. Martin. This union was blessed with a son and three daughters. The family made their home in Richmond. Carrie took pride in raising her children and keeping a beautiful home. When her children were older she began working at Cold Spring Granite, where she worked in the bronze department. In 2007, Carrie moved to Eden Valley where she lived until 2010, when she moved to Washburne Court in Paynesville. In January of 2012, Carrie moved to Koronis Manor in Paynesville when her health began to fail.

Carrie was a member of Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church in Richmond. She was a member of the Christian Mothers there. In January of 1994, Carrie and her family were awarded the Knights of Columbus Family of the month award. Carrie enjoyed baking, playing cards, Scrabble, embroidery, going to garage sales, having coffee with friends, and collecting bells, paper weights, and angels. Above all else Carrie loved her family; especially spending time with her grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Caroline C. Kulzer died on Sunday, December 14, 2014, at Koronis Manor in Paynesville at the age of 76. She is survived by her children, Mark (Judy) Kulzer of Paynesville, Sharon (Jake) McCullough of Savage, and Lillian (Ethan) Trower of Eden Valley; grandchildren, Kent Kulzer of Richmond, Jonathan (Amy) Kulzer of Paynesville, Kimberlee (Brandon Schmidt) of Belgrade, Andrew Trower of St. Cloud, Keegan McCullough of Savage, and Connor McCullough of Savage; great grandchildren, Noah Lang, Kadyn Kulzer, and Zander Kulzer. She is also survived by her siblings, Mary (Robert) Wehseler of Cold Spring, Bud Jonas of Richmond, Evie Hoeschen of Buffalo, Chris Hoeschen of Cold Spring; sister-in-law, Kathy Jonas of Albany; many nieces and nephews.

Carrie was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Donald; infant daughter, Anita; infant sister, Mary Viola Jonas; brother, Ray “Butch” Jonas Jr.; sister-in-law, Carol Jonas; and brothers-in-law, Bob Hoeschen and Jim Hoeschen.

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Ashley Keppers, Infant http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/ashley-keppers-infant/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/ashley-keppers-infant/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 14:57:07 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18733 Ashley   Keppers, Infant

Ashley Rose Keppers, infant, of Sauk Centre, passed away after complications from heart problems on Saturday, December 13, 2014 at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

A funeral service will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, December 19 at United Methodist Church in Sauk Centre.

Friends and family may visit from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday at the Patton-Schad Funeral Home in Sauk Centre and from 12 to 1 p.m. Friday at the church in Sauk Centre.

Ashley Rose was born November 4, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minnesota to Brian Keppers and Cheryl Stansbury. She was a joy to the family and will be forever missed. She brought lots of life to her family and the family would like those coming to the funeral to wear cheerful clothes in her honor.

An Angel in the Book of Life wrote down my Baby’s birth then whispered as she closed the Book, “Too Beautiful for Earth…”

Survivors include her parents, Brian Keppers and Cheryl Stansbury of Sauk Centre; brothers and sisters, Amy, Trevor, Nicholas, Sarah, Zachary, Justine, and Justin all at home; grandparents, Robert and Jeanette Stansbury of Sauk Centre, Dan and Linda Zins of Osakis, and Richard Krueger of Long Prairie; great-grandmother, Jeannette Nier of Little Falls; and many aunts, uncles, and cousins.

Ashley Rose was preceded in death by her great-grandparents, Ernest and Eveline Stansbury, Robert and Marvel Barchenger, and Herbert Keppers.

Serving as casket bearers will be Daniel Mahn and Chris Keppers.

Arrangements were made with Patton-Schad Funeral and Cremation Services of Sauk Centre.

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Banana Waffles http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/banana-waffles/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/banana-waffles/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 00:47:10 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18721 1 1/3 c. sifted flour
1 Tbsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 c. melted butter
2 tsp. baking powder
1 c. milk
2 eggs, separated
1 large banana, mashed

Sift the flour, salt and baking powder together. Beat the egg yolks until light and foamy. Add the sugar and butter. Mix well. Add the milk alternately with the sifted dry ingredients to the egg yolk mixture. Blend in the mashed banana. Fold in the stiffly beaten egg whites. Bake on a hot, lightly greased waffle iron. Makes six waffles.

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Overnight Fruit Salad http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/overnight-fruit-salad/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/overnight-fruit-salad/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 00:46:40 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18719 1 pkg. vanilla pudding mix (3 oz. size)
2 cans (11 oz.) mandarin oranges, drained
1 can (20 oz.) pineapple chunks, drain and reserve juice
1 can (16 oz. size) cherries, pitted and drained
1 1/2 c. pineapple juice (Add water to make this measurement)
3 bananas, sliced
2 apples, diced with skins (optional)
1 can (16 oz.) chunky mixed fruit for salad, drained

Substitute pineapple juice for milk and cook pudding according to directions on the package. Cool. Add well-drained fruits to cooled pudding mixture and refrigerate in covered glass bowl overnight. Add bananas and apples shortly before serving. Serve in individual or one large salad bowl. Makes 8 to 10 servings.

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Super Delicious Barbecue Spread http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/super-delicious-barbecue-spread/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/super-delicious-barbecue-spread/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 00:46:07 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18717 1/2 c. chopped onion
1 Tbsp. prepared mustard
2 Tbsp. butter
1 lb. ground beef
1/2 tsp. salt
2 Tbsp. flour
1/4 tsp. pepper
6 Tbsp. ketchup
2/3 c. sour cream

Brown chopped onion in butter, add ground beef and brown. Mix together flour, ketchup, mustard, salt and pepper and add to meat. Simmer five to 10 minutes. When ready to serve, add sour cream. Makes about 12 servings on buns.

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Lemon Sauce http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/lemon-sauce/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/lemon-sauce/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 00:45:42 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18715 3/4 c. sugar
Grated lemon rind
Few grains of salt
Juice of one large lemon
2 Tbsp. cornstarch
1 tsp. butter
1 c. water
Few grains nutmeg

Combine sugar, salt and cornstarch. Add the water and lemon rind. Bring to a boil and cook until the mixture is clear. Add the butter. Shortly before serving, add lemon juice and nutmeg. (This method of mixing gives the sauce a fresher lemon taste than when the juice is cooked with the others ingredients.)

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Sausage Lasagna Wraps http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/sausage-lasagna-wraps/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/sausage-lasagna-wraps/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 00:45:17 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18713 Cook and drain: 6 lasagna noodles
Split six polish sausages lengthwise. Place a slice of mozzarella cheese in each slit. Wrap each sausage in a lasagna noodle. Place in baking dish and cover with 1 16 ounce jar of spaghetti sauce. Bake 30 minutes. Sprinkle parmesan cheese on top (Serve with a salad and fruit dessert. A meal fit for a king.

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Italian Pasta Salad http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/italian-pasta-salad-2/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/italian-pasta-salad-2/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 00:44:58 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18711 1 7 oz. box spiral macaroni
1 small jar green olives
1/3 of an onion, thinly sliced
1 tomato, diced
1/2 of a green pepper, diced
1/8 c. Parmesan cheese
1 pkg. sliced pepperoni
1/3 of a 12 oz. bottle of Italian dressing

Combine vegetables, pepperoni and macaroni together. Combine with cheese and dressing. Keeps in the refrigerator for one week.

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Cheddar Pasta Salad http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/cheddar-pasta-salad/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/cheddar-pasta-salad/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 00:44:28 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18709 1 1/2 c. uncooked noodles
4 hard cooked eggs, chopped
3/4 c. diced celery
1/2 c. sliced radishes
1/4 c. chopped stuffed olives
2 Tbsp. chopped parsley (or substitute dried)
1 1/2 c. shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
1 c. dairy sour cream
1 Tbsp. lemon juice
2 tsp. seasoned salt
1 tsp. prepared mustard
1/2 tsp. salt

Cook the noodles in boiling salted water until tender, but not mushy. Rinse and drain. Put eggs, celery, radishes, olives, parsley and cheese in mixing bowl with noodles. Combine sour cream, lemon juice, mustard, seasoned salt and regular salt. Pour over noodle mixture and toss lightly. Chill thoroughly before serving so the flavors blend. (Add a lump of butter to the water in which the noodles are cooked and this will prevent a ‘spill-over.’

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Holiday toys may present a high risk of eye injury http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/holiday-toys-may-present-a-high-risk-of-eye-injury/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/holiday-toys-may-present-a-high-risk-of-eye-injury/#comments Thu, 18 Dec 2014 16:01:57 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18704 By John Michaelson
Minnesota News Connection

As parents across Minnesota continue to pack the malls and stores, remember that some gifts for their children can bring pain as well as joy.

Thousands of accidents in the U.S. each year involving children and toys result in eye injuries and even blindness.

Optometrist Jessica Schara says there is a long list of dangerous toys.

“BB guns, paint guns, slingshots, darts — anything that’s a projectile,” she said. “But even things like chemistry sets, woodworking sets, crafts that involve scissors and glue, can also be dangerous.”

Schara adds parents need to heed the age recommendations of toy manufacturers and teach their children about safe use.

One common toy-related eye injury is a corneal abrasion, but Schara says she also has treated children with more serious trauma, including orbital bone fractures and detached retinas.

“What’s important for everybody to know is, if there is any sort of eye injury, you really should seek the advice of an eye-care practitioner,” she said, “because sometimes there are things that aren’t visible deep inside the eye that might be going on, that could potentially lead to vision loss.”

Toys that could do physical harm to a child’s eyes, however, are not the only danger to vision that may come wrapped up under the tree. Schara points to all those tech gadgets and screen time.

“Blue light from things like tablets, smart phones, computers and even the TVs can cause computer vision eye strain,” she said.

For children and adults who have long periods of screen time, one recommendation is to follow the 20-20-20 rule. That’s taking a 20 second break every 20 minutes, and viewing something 20 feet away.

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Stress mixed with smiles: A holiday tradition for some families http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/stress-mixed-with-smiles-a-holiday-tradition-for-some-families/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/stress-mixed-with-smiles-a-holiday-tradition-for-some-families/#comments Thu, 18 Dec 2014 16:00:39 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18702 By John Michaelson
Minnesota News Connection

While the holidays are a happy time for many, the stress associated with family obligations and dynamics can be the “lump of coal” in some people’s Christmas stockings.

According to the American Psychological Association, fatigue and stress are the top sources of negative feelings during this time of year. Sometimes, said clinical social worker and psychotherapist Lisa Ferentz, the best thing to do is simply not take part in potentially stressful situations.

“Sometimes,” she said, “you have to give yourself permission to avoid family interactions that you know are going to be too painful or that will set you up to be ‘triggered’ in some way.”

If you do feel compelled to see family or friends who can be a source of conflict, Ferentz said, limit the time you spend, bring a friend to act as a buffer and use your cell phone as an excuse for a break.

Sometimes, the best relief is to break away from habits from the past, she said, by beginning a new tradition or doing something for others.

“I encourage people to volunteer during this time of year,” Ferentz said. “I think when you do things that kind of help you step outside of yourself and your own emotional upset, it gives you perspective about life. It also helps you to kind of reclaim a feeling of gratitude.”

Ferentz said it’s also important to avoid self-destructive behaviors such as overeating or drinking too much — and replace them with exercise or meditation.

Tips from the American Psychological Association are online at apa.org.

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Bouncing Back From $ Goofs http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/bouncing-back-from-goofs/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/bouncing-back-from-goofs/#comments Wed, 17 Dec 2014 21:30:02 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?guid=ac14b08facb4e5a3832812b4744ac735 We’re not perfect. We’re all guilty of one financial mistake or two, whether it happened yesterday or years ago. How do you shake off these money blunders and bounce back? With some honesty, reflection, preparation and a touch of class.

I made my fair share of mistakes in life, and although financially conscious, I had missteps on the money front, too. I still remember those feelings of anxiety and disappointment when I realized I messed up.

Dwelling on past failure doesn’t help you. Follow these steps I learned from my experience to come out from a bad financial error:

1. Acknowledge the problem. The first step to solving any problem is admitting you have one, right? Call out the issue at hand and label it for what it is. Is it a loan that you cannot pay off? Is it a shopping addiction? Maxed-out credit cards?

Admitting money problems is hard to do. It is more difficult when you don’t really pay attention to your finances - which is a problem in itself.

2. Answer some questions. If you’re in an unfortunate financial situation, chances are you got yourself there. This is not the time to play the blame game. What you need to do is taking the time to reflect on what false steps you took. What could you have done differently and what are you willing to do to prevent it in the future? What are some bad habits you need to break?

Dig into those fuzzy feelings you have about money. What beliefs do you have about money? Do you take an active role in your money? Do you deserve to be financially stable?

3. Clean the slate. If you owe somebody an explanation, reach out. Inform your friends, family, utility company, bank or whomever else about the issue you face, and let them know you’re ready to work toward a solution. Be open and honest with them. You’ll likely receive a much better response than if you ignore the problem.

4. Start walking the walk. Do what needs to be done to get back. Get a grip by setting up a debt pay-down schedule, tracking your expenses, creating a monthly savings goal and automating contributions. Have an accountability partner, a friend or spouse, to keep you on track. If you find that you’re not able handle your issue by yourself, seek help from people with the expertise you need.

Mistakes happen. Instead of beating yourself up, it’s time to set the wheels in motion for a fresh start.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Mary Beth Storjohann, CFP, is the founder of Workable Wealth, an RIA in San Diego. She is a writer, speaker and financial coach who is passionate about working with individuals and couples in their 20s and 30s to help them organize and gain confidence in their financial lives. She has been quoted or featured in various industry publications on the local and national level. You can find her on Twitter at @marybstorj.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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We’re not perfect. We’re all guilty of one financial mistake or two, whether it happened yesterday or years ago. How do you shake off these money blunders and bounce back? With some honesty, reflection, preparation and a touch of class.

I made my fair share of mistakes in life, and although financially conscious, I had missteps on the money front, too. I still remember those feelings of anxiety and disappointment when I realized I messed up.

Dwelling on past failure doesn’t help you. Follow these steps I learned from my experience to come out from a bad financial error:

1. Acknowledge the problem. The first step to solving any problem is admitting you have one, right? Call out the issue at hand and label it for what it is. Is it a loan that you cannot pay off? Is it a shopping addiction? Maxed-out credit cards?

Admitting money problems is hard to do. It is more difficult when you don’t really pay attention to your finances - which is a problem in itself.

2. Answer some questions. If you’re in an unfortunate financial situation, chances are you got yourself there. This is not the time to play the blame game. What you need to do is taking the time to reflect on what false steps you took. What could you have done differently and what are you willing to do to prevent it in the future? What are some bad habits you need to break?

Dig into those fuzzy feelings you have about money. What beliefs do you have about money? Do you take an active role in your money? Do you deserve to be financially stable?

3. Clean the slate. If you owe somebody an explanation, reach out. Inform your friends, family, utility company, bank or whomever else about the issue you face, and let them know you’re ready to work toward a solution. Be open and honest with them. You’ll likely receive a much better response than if you ignore the problem.

4. Start walking the walk. Do what needs to be done to get back. Get a grip by setting up a debt pay-down schedule, tracking your expenses, creating a monthly savings goal and automating contributions. Have an accountability partner, a friend or spouse, to keep you on track. If you find that you’re not able handle your issue by yourself, seek help from people with the expertise you need.

Mistakes happen. Instead of beating yourself up, it’s time to set the wheels in motion for a fresh start.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Mary Beth Storjohann, CFP, is the founder of Workable Wealth, an RIA in San Diego. She is a writer, speaker and financial coach who is passionate about working with individuals and couples in their 20s and 30s to help them organize and gain confidence in their financial lives. She has been quoted or featured in various industry publications on the local and national level. You can find her on Twitter at @marybstorj.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Planning: It Takes Two http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/planning-it-takes-two/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/planning-it-takes-two/#comments Wed, 17 Dec 2014 20:00:02 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?guid=412b0e08abf9eae58901304cf637bf1d When taking on a partnered client, it takes two. I always want to meet with both parts of the couple. Sometimes, I am often disappointed to find women don’t want to play an active role in money matters. Planning investment strategies and long-term finances takes active input from both wife and husband.

It’s essential, actually, that women have a role in planning. Women have longer lifespans than men and are likely to outlive their husbands. Proper planning prepares the surviving spouse, usually the wife, to handle the financial matters during the hard time of losing a loved one.

Joe and Brenda were my clients. Joe hired me to be their financial advisor, and we worked together for almost six years. He was an engineer in Silicon Valley before he retired and went to law school at Santa Clara University to become an attorney. Brenda worked part time, raising their sons.

Joe funded most of the accounts, while Brenda let her husband take the financial lead. Brenda is like a lot of women who often let their husbands take quarterly meetings alone. I find that isn’t really in a couple’s best interest.

In my practice, women and money are a significant focus. A woman is expected to live at least seven years longer than her husband. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, a third of married couples are within a year of each other, but for 53% of them, the husband is older. Seven years plus the age difference between the husband and wife—this gives you a way to anticipate how long a woman might live on after her husband passes away.

When a wife doesn’t learn the long term planning details of the finances, she sets herself up for a very uncomfortable financial future. When her husband dies, she too often doesn’t know the details about life insurance, bank account details, and what plans have been made with the advisor. In some cases, she doesn’t even know where the accounts are.

While sensitive to respecting relationship dynamics, I made an extra effort to reach out to Brenda. I invited Brenda and Joe to lunch, and we all engaged in conversation that wasn’t limited to their money concerns. My goal was to create a good working relationship with Brenda, too

A couple of years into Joe’s encore career as an attorney, he called me to tell me he had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The prognosis wasn’t good. We scheduled a meeting to talk through his plans that both Joe and Brenda attended.

Joe said at the start of the meeting, “Well, I always knew I was going to die. I just didn’t know it would be so soon.” Brenda was there. She was strong. I was especially moved by his acceptance and peacefulness.

Over the time Joe and Brenda had been working with me, we drafted a revocable living trust and got their estate plans in order. There wasn’t much left to do. The i’s were dotted and the t’s were crossed. We made sure we were in communication with their kids.

About three months later, Brenda called and said Joe had died. It was really hard. We attended the funeral and the mass.

As painful as a death can be, Brenda experienced a seamless financial transition with no misstep. The money transferred easily into her name. Their estate plan was intact. I’m proud to be able to help Brenda. If I didn’t have a relationship with her, it could have gone a bunch of different ways.

The next time I saw Brenda, she brought her sons and their wives to the meeting. There were five of them sitting around the table. Brenda got to tell her family that she plans to bounce her last check — it was a joke. She won’t. Her finances are well taken care of.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Hilary Hendershott, MBA, CFP, is founder and Chief Executive of Silicon Valley-based Hilary Hendershott Financial. The firm offers a suite of products and services including fee-only planning. She regularly writes about personal finance at HilaryHendershott.com. You can find her on Twitter @HilarytheCFP.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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When taking on a partnered client, it takes two. I always want to meet with both parts of the couple. Sometimes, I am often disappointed to find women don’t want to play an active role in money matters. Planning investment strategies and long-term finances takes active input from both wife and husband.

It’s essential, actually, that women have a role in planning. Women have longer lifespans than men and are likely to outlive their husbands. Proper planning prepares the surviving spouse, usually the wife, to handle the financial matters during the hard time of losing a loved one.

Joe and Brenda were my clients. Joe hired me to be their financial advisor, and we worked together for almost six years. He was an engineer in Silicon Valley before he retired and went to law school at Santa Clara University to become an attorney. Brenda worked part time, raising their sons.

Joe funded most of the accounts, while Brenda let her husband take the financial lead. Brenda is like a lot of women who often let their husbands take quarterly meetings alone. I find that isn’t really in a couple’s best interest.

In my practice, women and money are a significant focus. A woman is expected to live at least seven years longer than her husband. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, a third of married couples are within a year of each other, but for 53% of them, the husband is older. Seven years plus the age difference between the husband and wife—this gives you a way to anticipate how long a woman might live on after her husband passes away.

When a wife doesn’t learn the long term planning details of the finances, she sets herself up for a very uncomfortable financial future. When her husband dies, she too often doesn’t know the details about life insurance, bank account details, and what plans have been made with the advisor. In some cases, she doesn’t even know where the accounts are.

While sensitive to respecting relationship dynamics, I made an extra effort to reach out to Brenda. I invited Brenda and Joe to lunch, and we all engaged in conversation that wasn’t limited to their money concerns. My goal was to create a good working relationship with Brenda, too

A couple of years into Joe’s encore career as an attorney, he called me to tell me he had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The prognosis wasn’t good. We scheduled a meeting to talk through his plans that both Joe and Brenda attended.

Joe said at the start of the meeting, “Well, I always knew I was going to die. I just didn’t know it would be so soon.” Brenda was there. She was strong. I was especially moved by his acceptance and peacefulness.

Over the time Joe and Brenda had been working with me, we drafted a revocable living trust and got their estate plans in order. There wasn’t much left to do. The i’s were dotted and the t’s were crossed. We made sure we were in communication with their kids.

About three months later, Brenda called and said Joe had died. It was really hard. We attended the funeral and the mass.

As painful as a death can be, Brenda experienced a seamless financial transition with no misstep. The money transferred easily into her name. Their estate plan was intact. I’m proud to be able to help Brenda. If I didn’t have a relationship with her, it could have gone a bunch of different ways.

The next time I saw Brenda, she brought her sons and their wives to the meeting. There were five of them sitting around the table. Brenda got to tell her family that she plans to bounce her last check — it was a joke. She won’t. Her finances are well taken care of.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Hilary Hendershott, MBA, CFP, is founder and Chief Executive of Silicon Valley-based Hilary Hendershott Financial. The firm offers a suite of products and services including fee-only planning. She regularly writes about personal finance at HilaryHendershott.com. You can find her on Twitter @HilarytheCFP.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Things to Do Before 2015 http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/things-to-do-before-2015/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/things-to-do-before-2015/#comments Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:30:04 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?guid=5a1138e84f8d308d6b092e66fd80f04a The year-end holidays approach, and bring lots of things to do. Yet with holiday cheer there are financial plans to make, too.

Consider these financial opportunities before 2015 arrives.

Making financial gifts. As we count our many blessings and share time with our loved ones, we can express our thanks through giving to others. Donate appreciated securities to your favorite charity before year-end. You may take a deduction amounting to the current market value at the time of the donation, and you can use it on your tax returns for 2014 to counterbalance up to 30% of your adjusted gross income. That’s your taxable income – your gross income minus deductions.

You can gift assets or cash to your child, any relative or even a friend, and take advantage of the annual gift tax exclusion. Any individual can gift up to $14,000 this year to as many other individuals as he or she desires; a couple may jointly gift up to $28,000. Whether you choose to gift singly or jointly, you’ve probably got a long way to go before using up the current $5.34 million ($10.68 million for couples) lifetime exemption.

Grandparents and aunts uncles and parents too can fund 529 college saving plans this way, so it is worth noting that Dec. 31 is the 529 funding deadline for the 2014 tax year.  

Max out retirement plans. Most employers offer a 401(k) or 403(b) plan, and you have until Dec. 31 to boost your 2014 contribution. This year, the contribution limit on both 401(k) and 403(b) plans is $17,500 for those under 50, $23,000 for those 50 and older. This year, the traditional and Roth individual retirement account contribution limit is $5,500 for those under 50, $6,500 for those 50 and older.

High earners may face a lower Roth IRA contribution ceiling per their adjusted gross income level – above $129,000 AGI, an individual filing as single or head of household can’t make a Roth contribution for 2014, and neither can joint filers with AGI exceeding $191,000. Recently, the IRS raised limits for retirement plan contributions to $18,000 for those under 50 and $24,000 for those older than 50.

Remember IRA cash-outs. For those 70½ and older, who own one or more traditional IRAs, you have to take your annual required minimum distribution (RMD) from one or more of those IRAs by Dec. 31. If this is your very first RMD, you actually have until April 15 next year to take it, although note that this pushes up your 2015 overall taxable income. Also, original owners of Roth IRAs never have to take RMDs from those accounts.

Did you inherit an IRA? If you have and you weren’t married to the person who started that IRA, you must take the first RMD from that IRA by Dec. 31 of the year after the death of that original IRA owner. You have to do it whether the account is a traditional or a Roth IRA.

Consider dividing it into multiple inherited IRAs, thus extending the payout schedule for younger inheritors of those assets. Any co-beneficiaries receive distributions per the life expectancy of the oldest beneficiary. If you want to make this move, it must be done by the end of the year that follows the year in which the original IRA owner died.

If your spouse died, then, you should file Form 706 no later than nine months after his or her passing. This notifies the IRS that some or all of a decedent’s estate tax exemption is carried over to the surviving spouse. If your spouse died in 2011, 2012 or 2013, the IRS is allows you until Dec. 31, 2014 to file the pertinent Form 706, which reflects the transfer of the deceased loved one’s estate to yours, provided your spouse was a U.S. citizen or resident.  

Business owners’ retirement plans. If you have income from self-employment, you can save for the future using a self-directed retirement plan, such as a Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) plan or a one-person 401(k), the so-called Solo (k). You don’t have to be exclusively self-employed to set one of these up – you can work full-time for someone else and contribute to one of these while also deferring some of your salary into the retirement plan sponsored by your employer.2

Contributions to SEPs and Solo (k) s are tax-deductible. December 31 is the deadline to set one up for 2014, and if you meet that deadline, you can make your contributions for 2014 as late as April 15, 2015 (or October 15, 2015 with a federal extension).

You can contribute up to $52,000 to SEP for 2014, $57,500 if you are 50 or older. For a Solo (k), the same limits apply but they break down to $17,500-plus, up to 20%, and $23,000 and higher for the over-50s – both up to 20% of net self-employment income if you are 50 or older.

If you contribute to a 401(k) at work, the sum of your employee salary deferrals plus your Solo (k) contributions can’t be greater than the $17,500/$23,000 limits. But even so, you can still pour up to 20% of your net self-employment income into a Solo (k).

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Walid L. Petiri, AAMS, RFC, is chief strategist at Financial Management Strategies LLC in Baltimore. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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The year-end holidays approach, and bring lots of things to do. Yet with holiday cheer there are financial plans to make, too.

Consider these financial opportunities before 2015 arrives.

Making financial gifts. As we count our many blessings and share time with our loved ones, we can express our thanks through giving to others. Donate appreciated securities to your favorite charity before year-end. You may take a deduction amounting to the current market value at the time of the donation, and you can use it on your tax returns for 2014 to counterbalance up to 30% of your adjusted gross income. That’s your taxable income – your gross income minus deductions.

You can gift assets or cash to your child, any relative or even a friend, and take advantage of the annual gift tax exclusion. Any individual can gift up to $14,000 this year to as many other individuals as he or she desires; a couple may jointly gift up to $28,000. Whether you choose to gift singly or jointly, you’ve probably got a long way to go before using up the current $5.34 million ($10.68 million for couples) lifetime exemption.

Grandparents and aunts uncles and parents too can fund 529 college saving plans this way, so it is worth noting that Dec. 31 is the 529 funding deadline for the 2014 tax year.  

Max out retirement plans. Most employers offer a 401(k) or 403(b) plan, and you have until Dec. 31 to boost your 2014 contribution. This year, the contribution limit on both 401(k) and 403(b) plans is $17,500 for those under 50, $23,000 for those 50 and older. This year, the traditional and Roth individual retirement account contribution limit is $5,500 for those under 50, $6,500 for those 50 and older.

High earners may face a lower Roth IRA contribution ceiling per their adjusted gross income level – above $129,000 AGI, an individual filing as single or head of household can’t make a Roth contribution for 2014, and neither can joint filers with AGI exceeding $191,000. Recently, the IRS raised limits for retirement plan contributions to $18,000 for those under 50 and $24,000 for those older than 50.

Remember IRA cash-outs. For those 70½ and older, who own one or more traditional IRAs, you have to take your annual required minimum distribution (RMD) from one or more of those IRAs by Dec. 31. If this is your very first RMD, you actually have until April 15 next year to take it, although note that this pushes up your 2015 overall taxable income. Also, original owners of Roth IRAs never have to take RMDs from those accounts.

Did you inherit an IRA? If you have and you weren’t married to the person who started that IRA, you must take the first RMD from that IRA by Dec. 31 of the year after the death of that original IRA owner. You have to do it whether the account is a traditional or a Roth IRA.

Consider dividing it into multiple inherited IRAs, thus extending the payout schedule for younger inheritors of those assets. Any co-beneficiaries receive distributions per the life expectancy of the oldest beneficiary. If you want to make this move, it must be done by the end of the year that follows the year in which the original IRA owner died.

If your spouse died, then, you should file Form 706 no later than nine months after his or her passing. This notifies the IRS that some or all of a decedent’s estate tax exemption is carried over to the surviving spouse. If your spouse died in 2011, 2012 or 2013, the IRS is allows you until Dec. 31, 2014 to file the pertinent Form 706, which reflects the transfer of the deceased loved one’s estate to yours, provided your spouse was a U.S. citizen or resident.  

Business owners’ retirement plans. If you have income from self-employment, you can save for the future using a self-directed retirement plan, such as a Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) plan or a one-person 401(k), the so-called Solo (k). You don’t have to be exclusively self-employed to set one of these up – you can work full-time for someone else and contribute to one of these while also deferring some of your salary into the retirement plan sponsored by your employer.2

Contributions to SEPs and Solo (k) s are tax-deductible. December 31 is the deadline to set one up for 2014, and if you meet that deadline, you can make your contributions for 2014 as late as April 15, 2015 (or October 15, 2015 with a federal extension).

You can contribute up to $52,000 to SEP for 2014, $57,500 if you are 50 or older. For a Solo (k), the same limits apply but they break down to $17,500-plus, up to 20%, and $23,000 and higher for the over-50s – both up to 20% of net self-employment income if you are 50 or older.

If you contribute to a 401(k) at work, the sum of your employee salary deferrals plus your Solo (k) contributions can’t be greater than the $17,500/$23,000 limits. But even so, you can still pour up to 20% of your net self-employment income into a Solo (k).

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Walid L. Petiri, AAMS, RFC, is chief strategist at Financial Management Strategies LLC in Baltimore. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Ax Corporate Income Taxes http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/ax-corporate-income-taxes/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/ax-corporate-income-taxes/#comments Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:30:02 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?guid=2dc640c2723eb33c7f407336545f4aa0 Talk of overhauling the tax code is stirring in Washington, but the overwhelming complexity of the task makes it difficult to accomplish, at least in the near term. Here’s a good, clean, quick way to tackle part of tax reform – and produce an economic bonanza: abolish the corporate income tax.

In the recent election cycle, hot issues were job outsourcing overseas and demands that corporations “pay their fair share of taxes.” What are the facts and why are these issues important to the job needs of American workers and your investment accumulation and retirement funding plans?

In the Georgia U.S. Senate contest in Georgia, Republican David Perdue’s unsuccessful opponent attacked him for “outsourcing jobs to China,” as part of his efforts to rescue several underperforming corporations. Castigating business, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) asserted, “Despite record breaking profits, corporations bring in less than 9% of federal taxes. It’s time for tax reform.” Tax reform is needed, but not as Sanders would propose.

According to politifact.com, in 2013 corporations accounted for 10% of the federal tax take. The rest came from individuals (50%), social insurance and retirement taxes (36%), excise taxes and other (4%). In other words, the largest source of federal taxes came from taxes on work and investment. Washington taxes corporations up to 35%, the highest rate among major economies.

Here’s a proposal. Let’s create jobs, boost taxable worker pay, and increase stock values in retirement plans so that when money is taken out, taxes rise. How? Cut the corporate tax rate to zero.

No one starts a business and takes a risk unless they believe they will make a profit. Investors will not risk capital unless they can foresee a return from it. What else can a business do with profits? Pay people, provide benefits, pay for outside services, invest in or lease plants, other real estate and equipment. A company can invest in new product design and research, plus advertise products and services. This is the kind of healthy economic activity needed to expand our economy and create jobs.

A company can pay dividends to shareholders. It can buy back stock to increase earnings per share, thereby increasing stock values. Does this just benefit the maligned 1%? No. It benefits small investors, mom and pop Main Street, people saving for retirement in their individual retirement accounts, 401(k) plans, union pension plans and mutual funds.

Think about it. With no income tax, companies of every ilk would have more money to spend on economic activity, all of which creates tax revenue on the part of people who benefit. The U.S. would be the world’s hottest tax haven with our rule of law, political stability and global currency. The billions in corporate profits stashed overseas would come home and go to work.

As to outsourcing, if a company goes broke because it cannot compete, everybody loses. But increasingly you hear about insourcing, where American jobs stay in the U.S. or come here from overseas.

Auto plants moved from high-cost Northern states to the Southeast. Boeing is building 787 Dreamliners in a non-union plant near Charleston, S.C., where labor unrest is not a factor and costs are lower. An Australian company is building ships in Mobile, Ala. A number of American and foreign companies have “outsourced jobs” to the southeast, Texas, and other states where taxes are less and entrenched unions are not a factor. Who said, “Taxes don’t matter”?

Despite competition from cheap labor abroad, the U.S. remains a manufacturing powerhouse. As an NBC News report points out, the U.S. produced 18.2% of the world’s goods versus China at 17.6%.

Now, with costs rising in Tier 1 Chinese coastal cities, more production is being outsourced from China to the U.S. The Chinese company Haier Group makes refrigerators in South Carolina. Lenovo is making ThinkPads in NC. In September with a listing on the New York Stock Exchange, the Chinese e-commerce firm Alibaba Group set a record for the biggest initial public offering in the world.

Europe’s Airbus will build A320 airliners in Alabama. Foreign automakers Honda, Toyota, Hyundai, Kia and Volkswagen, along with tire giant Michelin, among others, have expanded manufacturing activity in the South.

Money goes where it is best treated. Taxes matter. If we made America the world’s most favored tax haven, money will flow to the USA. Jobs will be created. Gross domestic product will grow. The money not drained off of business in taxes and payments to tax lawyers will go to other uses, and the multiplier effect will more than make up for corporate tax revenue lost.

Corporations don’t pay taxes, people do, whether in lower wages, lost jobs and diminished opportunities. It is time for tax reform.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Lewis Walker, CFP, is president of Walker Capital Management, LCC in Peachtree Corners, Ga. Securities and certain advisory services offered through The Strategic Financial Alliance Inc. (SFA). Lewis Walker is a registered representative of The SFA, which is otherwise unaffiliated with Walker Capital Management. 770-441-2603. lewisw@theinvestmentcoach.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
Talk of overhauling the tax code is stirring in Washington, but the overwhelming complexity of the task makes it difficult to accomplish, at least in the near term. Here’s a good, clean, quick way to tackle part of tax reform – and produce an economic bonanza: abolish the corporate income tax.

In the recent election cycle, hot issues were job outsourcing overseas and demands that corporations “pay their fair share of taxes.” What are the facts and why are these issues important to the job needs of American workers and your investment accumulation and retirement funding plans?

In the Georgia U.S. Senate contest in Georgia, Republican David Perdue’s unsuccessful opponent attacked him for “outsourcing jobs to China,” as part of his efforts to rescue several underperforming corporations. Castigating business, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) asserted, “Despite record breaking profits, corporations bring in less than 9% of federal taxes. It’s time for tax reform.” Tax reform is needed, but not as Sanders would propose.

According to politifact.com, in 2013 corporations accounted for 10% of the federal tax take. The rest came from individuals (50%), social insurance and retirement taxes (36%), excise taxes and other (4%). In other words, the largest source of federal taxes came from taxes on work and investment. Washington taxes corporations up to 35%, the highest rate among major economies.

Here’s a proposal. Let’s create jobs, boost taxable worker pay, and increase stock values in retirement plans so that when money is taken out, taxes rise. How? Cut the corporate tax rate to zero.

No one starts a business and takes a risk unless they believe they will make a profit. Investors will not risk capital unless they can foresee a return from it. What else can a business do with profits? Pay people, provide benefits, pay for outside services, invest in or lease plants, other real estate and equipment. A company can invest in new product design and research, plus advertise products and services. This is the kind of healthy economic activity needed to expand our economy and create jobs.

A company can pay dividends to shareholders. It can buy back stock to increase earnings per share, thereby increasing stock values. Does this just benefit the maligned 1%? No. It benefits small investors, mom and pop Main Street, people saving for retirement in their individual retirement accounts, 401(k) plans, union pension plans and mutual funds.

Think about it. With no income tax, companies of every ilk would have more money to spend on economic activity, all of which creates tax revenue on the part of people who benefit. The U.S. would be the world’s hottest tax haven with our rule of law, political stability and global currency. The billions in corporate profits stashed overseas would come home and go to work.

As to outsourcing, if a company goes broke because it cannot compete, everybody loses. But increasingly you hear about insourcing, where American jobs stay in the U.S. or come here from overseas.

Auto plants moved from high-cost Northern states to the Southeast. Boeing is building 787 Dreamliners in a non-union plant near Charleston, S.C., where labor unrest is not a factor and costs are lower. An Australian company is building ships in Mobile, Ala. A number of American and foreign companies have “outsourced jobs” to the southeast, Texas, and other states where taxes are less and entrenched unions are not a factor. Who said, “Taxes don’t matter”?

Despite competition from cheap labor abroad, the U.S. remains a manufacturing powerhouse. As an NBC News report points out, the U.S. produced 18.2% of the world’s goods versus China at 17.6%.

Now, with costs rising in Tier 1 Chinese coastal cities, more production is being outsourced from China to the U.S. The Chinese company Haier Group makes refrigerators in South Carolina. Lenovo is making ThinkPads in NC. In September with a listing on the New York Stock Exchange, the Chinese e-commerce firm Alibaba Group set a record for the biggest initial public offering in the world.

Europe’s Airbus will build A320 airliners in Alabama. Foreign automakers Honda, Toyota, Hyundai, Kia and Volkswagen, along with tire giant Michelin, among others, have expanded manufacturing activity in the South.

Money goes where it is best treated. Taxes matter. If we made America the world’s most favored tax haven, money will flow to the USA. Jobs will be created. Gross domestic product will grow. The money not drained off of business in taxes and payments to tax lawyers will go to other uses, and the multiplier effect will more than make up for corporate tax revenue lost.

Corporations don’t pay taxes, people do, whether in lower wages, lost jobs and diminished opportunities. It is time for tax reform.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Lewis Walker, CFP, is president of Walker Capital Management, LCC in Peachtree Corners, Ga. Securities and certain advisory services offered through The Strategic Financial Alliance Inc. (SFA). Lewis Walker is a registered representative of The SFA, which is otherwise unaffiliated with Walker Capital Management. 770-441-2603. lewisw@theinvestmentcoach.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Cyril Mehr, 80 http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/cyril-mehr-80/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/cyril-mehr-80/#comments Tue, 16 Dec 2014 23:12:23 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18691 Cyril   Mehr, 80

Mass of Christian Burial will be 11:00 a.m. Thursday, December 18, 2014 at St. Martin Catholic Church in St. Martin, MN for Cyril Mehr, age 80, who died Saturday at his home. Burial will be in the St. Martin Parish Cemetery.

Relatives and friends may call from 4:00 8:00 p.m. Wednesday at Wenner Funeral Home in Richmond. Parish prayers will be at 8:00 p.m. Visitation will continue from 9:00 10:15 a.m. Thursday morning at the funeral home.

Cyril was born in Zion Township to Frank J. and Clara (Heying) Mehr. He married Louise Mackedanz on May 30, 1961 in St. Agnes Catholic Church, Roscoe, MN. Cyril served in the Army Reserves. He lived and worked on the family farm his entire life. Cyril enjoyed playing cards, dancing, listening to music, restoring equipment, and taking care of animals. He was a member of St. Martin Lions, St. Joseph Society, Paynesville K.C.s and St. Martin Parish. Cyril served on the Paynesville school board from 1982 – 1988.

Survivors include his wife, Louise; children, Deb (Chris) Nistler, Ann (Bill) Vannurden, Ronald, Larry (Anne), Jim (Amy), Brian, Denise (Steve) Congdon, and Gina; special friends, Joe (Stacey) Witte; siblings, Lorraine Bueckers, Caroline (Linus) Heinen, Melvin (Cathie), Susan (Dennis) Wurm; 24 grandchildren, and 1 great-grandchild.

He was preceded in death by his daughter, Patricia and infant daughter, Ruth; his parents and sister, Bernelda Gertken.

Arrangements are with the Wenner Funeral Home in Richmond, MN.

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Jean Toenies, 72 http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/jean-toenies-72/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/jean-toenies-72/#comments Tue, 16 Dec 2014 23:12:17 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18688 Jean   Toenies, 72

Jean M. Toenies, age 72 of Sauk Centre, died peacefully after a short illness Friday, December 12, 2014 at the St. Cloud Hospital in St. Cloud, Minnesota.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, December 16 at St. Pauls Catholic Church in Sauk Centre with Rev. Tim Wenzel officiating. Interment will follow in Calvary Cemetery.
Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday and 9 to 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Patton-Schad Funeral Home in Sauk Centre. Parish prayers will be at 5 p.m. followed by a rosary Monday evening at the funeral home.
Jean Mary Toenies was born December 8, 1942 in St. Cloud, Minnesota to Joseph and Katherine (Bueckers) Toenies. She was a 1961 graduate of Mora High School and then attended secretarial school. After moving to Sauk Centre she became well-known for providing excellent babysitting and day care in homes, which she continued for many years. For the past seven years she had resided at Riverview Manor.
Jean enjoyed working on jigsaw puzzles, playing Scrabble and other board games. She looked forward to decorating and celebrating Christmas. She was a member of St. Pauls Catholic Church, prayed the rosary daily, and tended to her spiritual needs.
Survivors include brothers and sisters, Celine (Claude)Zabinski of Hibbing, Bernadette Fairchild of Post Falls, Idaho, Sr. Colette Toenies, OSF of Little Falls, Donald (Virginia) Toenies of Sauk Centre, JoAnn (Bernard) Deters of Osakis, Ralph (Sharon) Toenies of Mora, Harvey (Elizabeth Betty) Toenies of Mora, and David (Shirley) of North Branch; numerous nieces and nephews.
She was preceded in death by her parents; sister, Pauline Schmiesing; brothers, Jerome and Alphonse Toenies; infant brother, John.
Serving as casket bearers will be Kevin Toenies, Teresa Burlet, Wendy Toenies, Kenneth Toenies, Rodney Toenies, and Paul Schmiesing. Cross bearer will be Kathy Marthaler, scripture bearer will be Annette Kittelson, lectors will be Ryan Toenies and Richard Zabinski, and gift bearers will be Mary Doucette and Roger Zabinski. Honorary bearers will be residents and staff of Riverview Manor.
In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred.
Arrangements were made with Patton-Schad Funeral & Cremation Services of Sauk Centre.

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Julianna Trisko, 87 http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/julianna-trisko-87/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/julianna-trisko-87/#comments Tue, 16 Dec 2014 23:12:12 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18685 Julianna   Trisko, 87

Julianna J. Julie Trisko, age 87 of Sauk Centre, died peacefully surrounded by her family on Monday, December 15, 2014 at CentraCare Health Nursing Home in Sauk Centre, Minnesota.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, December 17 at the Patton-Schad Funeral Home in Sauk Centre. Rev. Jeremy Theis will officiate with interment following in the parish cemetery.
Visitation will be from 9 to11 a.m. Wednesday at the Patton-Schad Funeral Home in Sauk Centre.
Julianna June Weber was born June 23, 1927 in Sauk Centre, Minnesota to Leo and Mary (Tillman) Weber. On June 18, 1946 she married Alphonse Al Trisko at St. Pauls Catholic Church in Sauk Centre. The couple resided in Sauk Centre and Julie was employed by Burger Hut for 23 years. From 1988 to 1999 she was a valued part-time employee at Patton-Schad Funeral & Cremation Services, where she assisted the Pattons in many capacities, retiring in 1999.
Julie enjoyed outdoor activities including camping, gardening, and bird watching. She also enjoyed knitting, crocheting, and loved spending time with her family. She will be remembered as an honest, loving and caring wife, mother, and grandmother. She was a member of St. Pauls Catholic Church, Paul F. Donart VFW Post 2853 Auxiliary, Sauk Centre Senior Citizens, and the Hospital Auxiliary.
Survivors include her two children, Larry (Terry) Trisko of Melrose and Roseann (Darrell) Lewis of St. Paul; 15 grandchildren; 22 great-grandchildren; brothers-in-law, Raymond (Irene) Trisko, Jerome Trisko, Clarence (Rita) Trisko and Richard (Carol) Trisko, all of Sauk Centre; sister-in-law, Viola Kramer of Alexandria; son-in-law, Donald Woeste of Melrose; and daughters-in-law, Doris Trisko-Kuehne of Avon and Sally Colegrove of Fayetteville, Arkansas.
She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Alphonse Al Trisko on October 30, 2013; children, infant Mary Ann, Gene, Ron and Dennis Trisko, and Diane Woeste; brothers and sisters, Louis Weber, Emma Eckberg, Mary Barhorst, Julian Weber, Arthur Weber, Leona Pfeffer and Lucille Egan; and an infant sister.
Serving as casket bearers will be her grandchildren, Paul Woeste, Joe Woeste, Nick Trisko, Brian Trisko, Kayla Snow, and Teresa Woida.
Arrangements were made with Patton-Schad Funeral & Cremation Services of Sauk Centre.

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Donna Harmeling, 82 http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/donna-harmeling-82/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/12/donna-harmeling-82/#comments Tue, 16 Dec 2014 23:12:05 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=18682 Donna   Harmeling, 82

Donna A. Harmeling, age 82 of Sauk Centre, died Friday, December 12, 2014 at CentraCare Health Nursing Home in Sauk Centre, Minnesota.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. Monday, December 15 at St. Pauls Catholic Church in Sauk Centre with Rev. Jeremy Theis officiating. Private inurnment will be in St. Pauls Cemetery.
Visitation will be at the church on Monday one hour prior to the service.
Donna Agnes Baker was born July 17, 1932 in Albertville, Minnesota to Anthony and Agnes (Schlosser) Baker. On September 2, 1958 she married Aloysius Al Harmeling at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Osakis, Minnesota. Since her marriage she had resided in Sauk Centre.
Donna was a playground superintendent and worked in the kitchen at Holy Family School for several years. She was then a foster grandparent at Sauk Centre Elementary School and Kid Connection for many years. For the past 13 years she had been a resident of CentraCare Health Nursing Home in Sauk Centre.
She was a member of St. Pauls Catholic Church.
Survivors include her daughter, Peggy (Sylvester) Ruegemer of Sauk Centre.
She was preceded in death by her parents; and husband, Al Harmeling on March 9, 1995.
Serving as casket bearers will be Tom Harmeling, Dave Henry, Kob Nordli, Dave Schloegl, Tony Jennissen, and Bob Friedrichs. Cross bearer will be Kathy Henry.
Arrangements were made with Patton-Schad Funeral & Cremation Services of Sauk Centre.

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