Dairyland Peach http://dairylandpeach.com Sauk Centre, Minnesota Wed, 17 Sep 2014 15:09:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Rose Meyer, 100 http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/rose-meyer-100/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/rose-meyer-100/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 15:09:41 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17593 Rose    Meyer, 100

Rose E. Meyer, age 100 of Meire Grove, died September 14, 2014, at CentraCare Health Nursing Home in Melrose, Minnesota.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, September 19 at St. John the Baptist Church in Meire Grove with Rev. Marvin Enneking officiating and Rev. Ken Thielman concelebrating. Interment will be in the parish cemetery.

Visitation will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday and from 8:30 to 10 a.m. on Friday at Patton-Schad Funeral Home in Melrose. St. Marys Society will pray at 5 p.m. followed by parish prayers at 7 p.m. Thursday evening at the funeral home.

Rose Imdieke was born on May 26, 1914 in Meire Grove, Minnesota to Bernard and Elizabeth (Haverkamp) Imdieke. She married Leo J. Meyer on May 22, 1939 in Meire Grove. The couple farmed for eight years in Freeport before moving to a farm near Meire Grove.

Rose lived a long and full life, centered around her faith and love of family. She enjoyed quilting, baking, and gardening. She was a talented piano player and as a young woman, played in a band with family members and friends. She continued to entertain friends and family with her piano playing, even after she turned 100 in May of this year.

Rose was a member of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Meire Grove and St. Marys Society.

Rose is survived by her children, Loren (Sharon) Meyer of Melrose, Carol (Dennis) Flahave of New Brighton, Joel (Kathy) Meyer of Spring Park, Mary (Darrell) Steiner of Apple Valley, Harvey (Deb Nygaard) Meyer of St. Louis Park, and Ruth (Ernie) Bedor of Andover; 14 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren; sister, Lorraine Hellermann of Vadnais Heights; and brother, Lawrence Imdieke of Meire Grove.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Leo Meyer on July 2, 1991; grandson, Michael Bedor; brothers, Alphonse, Leo, Bernard, and Raphael Imdieke; and sisters, Philomena Minnie Hagemeier and Veronica Fronie Steinhofer.

Casket bearers will be grandsons, Shawn, Jason, and Eric Flahave, Ryan and Adam Meyer, Matthew and Corey Steiner, and Thomas Bedor. Granddaughters include cross bearer, Elizabeth Bedor; scripture bearer, Stacy (Flahave) Ramacher; gift bearers, Ashley Steiner and Lindsey Flahave; flower bearer, Allison (Bedor) Metcalfe; and reader, Claudia (Meyer) Revermann.

The family would like to thank the staff at CentraHealth-Melrose for the loving care they provided our mother while she was a resident at Park View and Pine Villa.
Rose E. Meyer, age 100 of Meire Grove, died September 14, 2014, at CentraCare Health Nursing Home in Melrose, Minnesota.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, September 19 at St. John the Baptist Church in Meire Grove with Rev. Marvin Enneking officiating and Rev. Ken Thielman concelebrating. Interment will be in the parish cemetery.

Visitation will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday and from 8:30 to 10 a.m. on Friday at Patton-Schad Funeral Home in Melrose. St. Marys Society will pray at 5 p.m. followed by parish prayers at 7 p.m. Thursday evening at the funeral home.

Rose Imdieke was born on May 26, 1914 in Meire Grove, Minnesota to Bernard and Elizabeth (Haverkamp) Imdieke. She married Leo J. Meyer on May 22, 1939 in Meire Grove. The couple farmed for eight years in Freeport before moving to a farm near Meire Grove.

Rose lived a long and full life, centered around her faith and love of family. She enjoyed quilting, baking, and gardening. She was a talented piano player and as a young woman, played in a band with family members and friends. She continued to entertain friends and family with her piano playing, even after she turned 100 in May of this year.

Rose was a member of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Meire Grove and St. Marys Society.

Rose is survived by her children, Loren (Sharon) Meyer of Melrose, Carol (Dennis) Flahave of New Brighton, Joel (Kathy) Meyer of Spring Park, Mary (Darrell) Steiner of Apple Valley, Harvey (Deb Nygaard) Meyer of St. Louis Park, and Ruth (Ernie) Bedor of Andover; 14 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren; sister, Lorraine Hellermann of Vadnais Heights; and brother, Lawrence Imdieke of Meire Grove.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Leo Meyer on July 2, 1991; grandson, Michael Bedor; brothers, Alphonse, Leo, Bernard, and Raphael Imdieke; and sisters, Philomena Minnie Hagemeier and Veronica Fronie Steinhofer.

Casket bearers will be grandsons, Shawn, Jason, and Eric Flahave, Ryan and Adam Meyer, Matthew and Corey Steiner, and Thomas Bedor. Granddaughters include cross bearer, Elizabeth Bedor; scripture bearer, Stacy (Flahave) Ramacher; gift bearers, Ashley Steiner and Lindsey Flahave; flower bearer, Allison (Bedor) Metcalfe; and reader, Claudia (Meyer) Revermann.

The family would like to thank the staff at CentraHealth-Melrose for the loving care they provided our mother while she was a resident at Park View and Pine Villa.
Rose E. Meyer, age 100 of Meire Grove, died September 14, 2014, at CentraCare Health Nursing Home in Melrose, Minnesota.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, September 19 at St. John the Baptist Church in Meire Grove with Rev. Marvin Enneking officiating and Rev. Ken Thielman concelebrating. Interment will be in the parish cemetery.

Visitation will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday and from 8:30 to 10 a.m. on Friday at Patton-Schad Funeral Home in Melrose. St. Marys Society will pray at 5 p.m. followed by parish prayers at 7 p.m. Thursday evening at the funeral home.

Rose Imdieke was born on May 26, 1914 in Meire Grove, Minnesota to Bernard and Elizabeth (Haverkamp) Imdieke. She married Leo J. Meyer on May 22, 1939 in Meire Grove. The couple farmed for eight years in Freeport before moving to a farm near Meire Grove.

Rose lived a long and full life, centered around her faith and love of family. She enjoyed quilting, baking, and gardening. She was a talented piano player and as a young woman, played in a band with family members and friends. She continued to entertain friends and family with her piano playing, even after she turned 100 in May of this year.

Rose was a member of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Meire Grove and St. Marys Society.

Rose is survived by her children, Loren (Sharon) Meyer of Melrose, Carol (Dennis) Flahave of New Brighton, Joel (Kathy) Meyer of Spring Park, Mary (Darrell) Steiner of Apple Valley, Harvey (Deb Nygaard) Meyer of St. Louis Park, and Ruth (Ernie) Bedor of Andover; 14 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren; sister, Lorraine Hellermann of Vadnais Heights; and brother, Lawrence Imdieke of Meire Grove.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Leo Meyer on July 2, 1991; grandson, Michael Bedor; brothers, Alphonse, Leo, Bernard, and Raphael Imdieke; and sisters, Philomena Minnie Hagemeier and Veronica Fronie Steinhofer.

Casket bearers will be grandsons, Shawn, Jason, and Eric Flahave, Ryan and Adam Meyer, Matthew and Corey Steiner, and Thomas Bedor. Granddaughters include cross bearer, Elizabeth Bedor; scripture bearer, Stacy (Flahave) Ramacher; gift bearers, Ashley Steiner and Lindsey Flahave; flower bearer, Allison (Bedor) Metcalfe; and reader, Claudia (Meyer) Revermann.

The family would like to thank the staff at CentraHealth-Melrose for the loving care they provided our mother while she was a resident at Park View and Pine Villa.

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Livestock identification and record keeping contributes to high quality animal care http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/livestock-identification-and-record-keeping-contributes-to-high-quality-animal-care/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/livestock-identification-and-record-keeping-contributes-to-high-quality-animal-care/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:00:35 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17568 By Emily Wilmes
University of Minnesota Extension

On any livestock farm, identification and record keeping is important. It’s crucial for several reasons: knowing an animal’s lineage, knowing its age, any treatment the animal has received, and other aspects of its history on your farm.

Not knowing which animal is which can lead to many detrimental management mistakes. Brenda Miller, livestock educator with Todd County Extension, recently published an article about this topic. She said, “It doesn’t matter if you have 30 or 3,000 cows; every producer needs to have an identification system in place.”

What are the options? What are the tools associated with those options? Ear tags are the most widely used type of identification on farms.   Ear tags are an easy, first form of identification for any age or size of animal with many different options to choose from. Choices can include color, size, personalization, laser engraved, or write-on tags.

If you worry about an animal losing its ear tag, you may consider double tagging your animals with one small and one large tag (or two large tags), both with the same name/number. That way should one tag get lost you will still have the other one and can replace the lost tag the next time the animal runs through the chute or comes into the barn.  If you choose ear tags, the supplies you’ll need are the tags and a tagging pliers.  If you worry about losing ear tags, you may want to look at a more permanent form of ID.

Permanent forms of identification include tattoos and brands.  Tattoos are placed in the ear of the animal, and can last forever. However, the downside to tattoos is they may be hard to read, and you will most likely need help applying them to your animals. Supplies needed to tattoo livestock include the tattoo pliers, letter and number dyes, and the ink. Branding is a well-known means of livestock identification. Today, most farmers do freezing branding, and it usually results in an easy to read, permanent ID. Some cons of branding are the extra work and people it requires, needing a restraint system such as a chute, and the cost of all of the supplies needed, which includes branding irons, liquid nitrogen, clippers, timer, disinfectant, and gloves.

Along with proper identification, adequate record keeping is crucial to any livestock operation. Every farm should be keeping records especially on animal identification and any treatments used on a specific animal.

When artificially inseminating, write down the service date, service sire, and due date for each cow. Keep a chart or a single page-per-cow to record when she calved, bull or heifer, dead or alive, ID of the calf, and any additional observations or comments.

Add to her chart every year she calves and include her vaccinations, illnesses, treatments, and any other life events she may have.

For day-to-day recording, this information in a notebook allows for easy access and quick notes. However, in addition to written notes, you should consider using record-keeping software, such as DairyComp, or at the very least making an Excel spreadsheet on the computer so you have everything down twice — written on paper and saved on the computer.

Identification and record keeping is important on any livestock operation, as it contributes to high quality animal care. If you have additional questions about identification and record keeping, call me at (320) 255-6169.

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Kevin Kling to keynote Sinclair Lewis Writer’s Conference Oct. 11 http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/kevin-kling-to-keynote-sinclair-lewis-writers-conference-oct-11/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/kevin-kling-to-keynote-sinclair-lewis-writers-conference-oct-11/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:00:52 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17560 The 25th annual Sinclair Lewis Writers’ Conference will be Saturday, Oct. 11, in the Sauk Centre High School Auditorium.

This year’s keynote speaker is Kevin Kling, author, playwright and teller of tales. Kling will be joined by three other professional writers who will share their writing and marketing expertise: Kim Ode, who will discuss effective interviewing techniques; Mary Casanova, who will examine how to turn experience and research into fiction and William Kent Krueger, who will show how to maximize the impact of setting in writing.

The day-long gathering will again look at the process of writing as well as selling what an author writes. Both beginning and established writers are invited to attend the conference.

Cost is $60, including lunch, breaks and a reception following at the Palmer House Hotel. College students and senior citizens may register for $55; high school students may attend for free, but must register and pay $15 for lunch and breaks.

For conference details, call Jim Umhoefer at (320) 429-0825, evenings.

The conference has attracted such renowned keynote speakers as Carol Bly, Robert Bly, Leif Enger, Patricia Hampl, Jon Hassler, Bill Holm, Jim Klobuchar, Frederick Manfred, Gary Paulsen, Don Shelby and Will Weaver.

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Walk for Thought set for Saturday, Sept. 20 http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/walk-for-thought-set-for-saturday-sept-20/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/walk-for-thought-set-for-saturday-sept-20/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:00:03 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17566 St. Cloud Hospital Rehabilitation Center and the MN Brain Injury Alliance wil host the fifth annual St. Cloud Walk for Thought at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 20, at CentraCare Health Plaza.

This one-mile walk will celebrate the strengths and successes of thousands of individuals who have experienced brain injury, along with their families, friends, and the professionals who support them. For information on supporting the walk or forming a team, call (612) 378-2742, (800) 699-6442 or visit www.braininjurymn.org.

Every year, at least 1.7 million people in the United States suffer from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. TBI is a contributing factor to a third of all injury-related deaths.

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Bull riding Brooten man’s dream come true http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/bull-riding-brooten-mans-dream-come-true/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/bull-riding-brooten-mans-dream-come-true/#comments Sun, 14 Sep 2014 13:00:27 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17572 Joe Tensen has loved all things western since he was a kid. Today he is living out his dreams by defeating the beast eight seconds at a time.

Joe Tensen has loved all things western since he was a kid. Today he is living out his dreams by defeating the beast eight seconds at a time.

By Kerry Drager
Correspondent

Joe Tensen of Brooten grew up on all things western — from his taste of music and his favorite movies right down to his boots. Inspired by the stories in his western paperbacks and the ones his father told about his time in the rodeo, Tensen was destined to become a cowboy.

“My dad was a bull rider when he was my age,” said Tensen. “When my sister was on the way and after he shattered his ankle, he said that was it. Better start making a real living supporting a family.”

After his graduation from Belgrade-Brooten-Elrosa High School in 2007, Tensen began following his dreams at becoming a professional bull rider. Without any practice or preparation other than those to his nerves, he signed up for his first bull riding competition and rode his first beast.

“I got my dad’s old equipment and went to the rodeo in Glenwood. Met some guys and they helped me on my first bull. I went six seconds and almost won the rodeo. I had the second longest ride of the night, and my first bull sure wasn’t easy on me. When I was on him in the shoots, he tried to jump out. I had quite a ride before they even opened the gates. So technically, I had ridden him for 18 seconds,” said Tensen.

After his first time success, Tensen sunk his teeth into the sport and continues to follow the rodeo. He currently rides for several circuits including the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA), National Federation of Professional Bull Riders (NFPB), Bull Riders of America and even the National Bull Riders Association (NBRA).

Although Tensen has natural talent and a strong drive to continue bull riding, practice was necessary to become successful in the larger circuits. Local practice pens in Long Prairie and Nimrod helped him become a better rider and also made him some good friends.

“One of the guys that helped me with bull riding was Lance Schwartz. We all call him ‘Sunshine’. He is in the top 50 in the PRCA in the world. I give him a lot of credit for helping me out. Also Troy Meech in Nimrod and Mike Traxler of Long Prairie. They have bulls for beginners and professionals. It’s just a good group of guys and a good business to be in.”

Tensen uses several ways aside from the practice pen to help keep his bull riding skills top of the line.

“Just riding horse bareback really helps your balance. Riding up and down the ditch bareback, it’s all about leaning back and forward. That has helped my bull riding. Also working out. I pretty much work out every single day no matter how late or early in the morning. I’m always trying to find time to stay with it. It’s helped me out quite a bit.”

This summer, Tensen has taken a break from the rodeo so that he could heal his body and focus on helping his family harvest hay on their farm. He admits that there have been a few rides that have really torn him up, and he is starting to feel the strain on his body. After suffering four concussions, he is still not ready to wear a helmet due to their weight and throwing off his balance.

Aside from helping his family at their farm, Tensen also drives truck hauling Roundup and hay. He enjoys working his own schedule so that he may squeeze in a rodeo and maybe even a little love interest as well.

During his time away from the rodeo this summer, Tensen found his future wife, Gabrielle Schuller. The two met on Snapchat and have been busy spending time fishing and exploring Minnesota together. Although her fiancé is a true cowboy by profession and character, she has yet to see him ride a bull.

One of the aspects of the rodeo that Tensen holds close to his heart is the faith that is found within the sport. He wears a gold cross at his neck and is thankful for every bull ride he walks away from unscathed.

“The thing I like about rodeo is that, even in this day of age, it is still all about faith. There is a preacher that follows the rodeo and before we go out, we will bow our heads and say a few words of prayer. We’re not afraid to show that we’re men of God.”

Tensen’s life is one of adrenaline, passion and faith. He will continue to enjoy the rodeo for as long as his body and God permits it. After allowing his body to heal up this summer, he is ready to try his luck again. This time there is a gal who loves him in the audience, prompting him to hang on even tighter through those very slow eight seconds of bucking power.

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Veterans help throw successful Nest Fest http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/veterans-help-throw-successful-nest-fest/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/veterans-help-throw-successful-nest-fest/#comments Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:45:54 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17577 Nest Fest featured Magician Norm Barnhart (right) who required the participation of several children in the crowd for his act including Sarah Lutze, daughter of Sheryl Stansbury of Sauk Centre.

Nest Fest featured Magician Norm Barnhart (right) who required the participation of several children in the crowd for his act including Sarah Lutze, daughter of Sheryl Stansbury of Sauk Centre.

By Kerry Drager
Correspondent

This year’s first annual Nest Fest was a huge success, drawing in a crowd of over 800 people on Saturday, Aug. 30. The fundraiser provided food and beverages throughout the day and had many activities for individuals of all ages, including live bands, bouncy houses, a car show, a silent auction and a magician.

The proceeds of the event will be used to help make improvements on the Eagle’s Healing Nest grounds. There are currently several buildings that are in need of renovations. These improvements will allow the Eagle’s Nest to provide additional housing for veterans as they are reintegrated back into the civilian world.

The Eagle’s Healing Nest began in 2012 after founder and director Melony Butler witnessed the struggle her sons endured as they battled post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after returning from Iraq. The lack of available care for her family and other veterans gave her the vision to start the Eagle’s Nest so that they could heal with honor after returning from war.

Several activities are offered at the Eagle’s Nest. Veterans have access to art classes and art therapy, reiki and wood shop among many others. There are plans to continue to build upon the resources available including bringing in the Heart of a Marine Foundation and utilizing the Medicine Wheel model.

The funds raised at Nest Fest will be used to help make those expansions a reality, and will also go towards other expense needs including transportation for vets. The goal was to raise $10,000, and that amount was surpassed this year.

“This is a place that they are creating. There are currently 47 vets that live here and they are from all over the state. After we renovate the buildings, we’ll be able to take in more veterans so they have a place to call home,” said Butler.

Nest Fest began as an idea that came to receptionist Julie Peterson one sleepless night. Peterson began volunteering for Eagle’s Nest last November. She enjoys helping out and wanted to find additional ways she could bring community awareness while raising funds.

“I sent out letters and I made phone calls. Lots of people wanted to help out. I started out with one band, then there were two bands. It grew until I had four bands, and I’ve had bands calling asking why they couldn’t play,” said Peterson.

The veterans had an important role during the event by assisting volunteers during the fest, by preparing the grounds for the gathering and by cleaning up at the end of the day. Butler has always dreamed that the Eagle’s Nest would be a place where the veterans could participate in the activities that occur there. Nest Fest is just another way that these men and women can begin to feel at peace again.

“You watch the veterans have their nest and create it,” said Butler.

Nest Fest is to be an annual event. A lot of work is left to be done on the grounds and a need for additional funds for services remains. Peterson hopes that every year will be better. She has already noted some things she would like to do differently next year and what things were successful.

“I would like to start planning this a lot sooner. I started the end of June on this. I think I should start planning in January,” said Peterson.

The Eagle’s Nest team was impressed by the community turn out for the event. Community support is a vital step for the success of the veterans and their reintegration process. They hope for continued support at next year’s Nest Fest and at other events that are held to benefit service men and women.

“Thank you to all that donated from their hearts and hands. That’s what helps us create our home,” said Butler.

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Trend toward less gym is in the wrong direction http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/trend-toward-less-gym-is-in-the-wrong-direction/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/trend-toward-less-gym-is-in-the-wrong-direction/#comments Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:40:02 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17581 WestWordsWEBNews that the Minneapolis Schools will allow students to graduate with one less gym glass brought mixed emotions. It seems odd that in the face of rising childhood obesity rates that physical fitness would take the hit. On the other hand, my memories of my own gym classes are so painful, I wouldn’t wish them on anyone else.

The only D I ever got in school was in gym one quarter. It wasn’t from lack of effort. It was the subject matter. In the fall we played touch football, soccer or volleyball, and I got Bs. We were on a quarter system, and second quarter was an easy A because we played basketball. Third quarter we spent six weeks learning to dance (everything from square dancing, to the waltz, foxtrot and cha-cha, and finished out the quarter with a sport that differed from year to year — bowling, ice skating, wrestling — which brought me back to a B.

Then came fourth quarter, in which we had tumbling — or gymnastics as it is known today. The simple truth was I was so uncoordinated that it couldn’t be helped.

In seventh grade I could not turn a forward somersault and even my backward somersault looked more like a floor mop changing direction than anything graceful. Front or back flips were out of the question. We spent some time on the parallel bars and high bar and I could barely manage a forward dismount.

We also were expected to climb a rope to the ceiling of the gym. I had classmates who could climb the rope upside down without using their legs at all. It was ninth grade before I could shimmy right side up even six feet.

In the end, I was a three sport athlete in high school, lettering in all three twice each. I also walked three-fourths of a mile to school each day, and usually ran the last half because my friends and I were often a bit late. When I graduated, I didn’t have an ounce of fat on me and precious little meat.

Thus, I understand the theory that if a student is playing extracurricular sports, he or she probably doesn’t have to take a gym class for fitness.

However, gym has changed a lot over the past 50 years, and many students are not involved in extracurricular athletics.

I don’t think it is too much to ask a student  to take at least 30 minutes every day they are in school for some physical activity. The fact is that the better one gets one’s blood flowing, the better one thinks and, therefore, learns.

It also isn’t rocket science that the major causes of ill health — too much sugar, too much salt and not enough exercise — are self-induced.

We expect our schools to teach our kids about everything from sex to how to prevent bullying. We ought not be reducing our efforts in teaching them ways to stay alive and healthy.

Tom West is the general manager of the Peach. Reach him at (320) 616-1932 or tom.west@ecm-inc.com.

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County workers are overpaid http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/county-workers-are-overpaid/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/county-workers-are-overpaid/#comments Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:30:52 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17583 To the editor: 

A report shows that Todd County employees are underpaid, compared to other counties. The two year study, known as the Springsted study, says the annual additional cost to bring wages in line would be $296,945.54.

Ann Antonsen, vice president of Springsted, is quoted as saying this leads to department heads expressing concerns for potential employer turnover. I say this would be an excellent time for them to quit this lowly paid government job.

As I’m writing this, I see an ad for an immediate opening at one of our best paying companies. They could start at $13.75 per hour with scheduled performance-based raises to $16.85 per hour.

Public sector unions are so great for union bosses and politicians, Gov. Dayton is organizing home healthcare workers and daycare providers. It doesn’t bother the politicians or unions that it places an unbearable burden on the average hardworking taxpayer, who pays his own bills and supports his own family. Is it any wonder people are fed up with this greed and corruption?

Could it be time for the county to make some big changes? Maybe privatizing most county work?

We are well on our way to becoming a three class country: the political elite, the government class and the Ex-Lax class. That would be the working class, who have to pay for the bloated wages, pensions and benefits of the other two classes.

At the very least, County Commissioners, how about publishing current union contracts in the county’s newspapers so the unions will have to explain to the public why they so desperately need wage and benefit increases? I suppose that would be illegal. If so, let’s do it anyway. I would much rather see taxpayer money go to lawyers than into union coffers to buy more politicians.

Tony Towle, Long Prairie

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Kids run, walk, ride set for Sept. 27 in St. Cloud http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/kids-run-walk-ride-set-for-sept-27-in-st-cloud/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/kids-run-walk-ride-set-for-sept-27-in-st-cloud/#comments Sat, 13 Sep 2014 14:00:45 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17558 Children of all ages and athletic abilities are invited to run, walk or roll whatever distance they can (50 or 100 meters, 1K, 1 mile or 5K) during the fifth annual Sneakers and Wheels event Saturday, Sept. 27 at CentraCare Health Plaza in St. Cloud.

Registration begins at 9 a.m. with a 10 a.m. start time for the first race.

The Sneakers and Wheels event is meant to increase opportunities for children to be physically active, regardless of their ability.

Cost is $10. All participants will receive a free gift. All pre-registered participants will be entered into a drawing for door prizes. To download a registration form, visit centracare.com. The event is sponsored by St. Cloud Hospital Pediatric Rehabilitation.

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Bob Loxtercamp Youre invited to Bob http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/bob-loxtercamp-youre-invited-to-bob/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/bob-loxtercamp-youre-invited-to-bob/#comments Fri, 12 Sep 2014 22:52:47 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17585 Bob Loxtercamp
Youre invited to Bob Loxtercamps 70th birthday Sept. 21st 1-5pm American Legion Sauk Centre

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Report: 11 percent of MN households are ‘food Insecure’ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/report-11-percent-of-mn-households-are-food-insecure/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/report-11-percent-of-mn-households-are-food-insecure/#comments Fri, 12 Sep 2014 18:00:41 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17564 By John Michaelson
Minnesota News Connection

Many of the leading economic indicators in Minnesota, such as the unemployment rate and manufacturing, continue to improve, but the rebound is not being fully felt when it comes to families struggling to put food on the table.

Just released figures show that 11 percent of households in the state were food insecure in 2013, about the same as the year before, says Colleen Moriarty, executive director of Hunger Solutions Minnesota.

“Flat is the new reality,” she said. “The new reality since the recession is that we have this enormous part of the population in Minnesota who are really in peril.”

Nationally, the story is similar. A new report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows about 14 percent of households were food insecure last year, essentially unchanged from 2012.

While some families that took hits during the recession have been regaining their financial footing, Moriarty says it takes time to fully recover, especially for those who lost jobs.

“If they’ve been unemployed for a while, they have bills to catch up on,” she said. “Their savings are gone.

“They may be re-employed, but they may be re-employed at a much lower rate than they previously had been.

“We know that it takes people 18 to 24 months to really get back on their feet.”

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Book Club, author to discuss ‘Delicate Armor,’ by Connie Claire Szarke http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/book-club-author-to-discuss-delicate-armor-by-connie-claire-szarke/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/book-club-author-to-discuss-delicate-armor-by-connie-claire-szarke/#comments Fri, 12 Sep 2014 14:00:09 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17562 The Granite City Book Club will meet with Minnesota author Connie Claire Szarke at its next meeting to discuss her new book “Delicate Armor.”

The meeting will be held at the Stearns History Museum in St. Cloud Wednesday, Sept. 17 at 6:30 p.m.

Set in the Upper Midwest from 1952 to 1991, “Delicate Armor” is the story of Callie Lindstrom, a feisty girl who shares a special bond with her father. Having lost an infant son, Will Lindstrom places his energy in young Callie, teaching her his love for the outdoors.

Accepted into the world of men within her family and witness to their dreams, struggles, and sense of humor, Callie learns to navigate waves of conflict and loss while realizing her own place in the web of life.

This family saga is about the tenacity of the human spirit, the natural world, and our narrator’s emerging consciousness as she passes from cheeky tomboy to self-possessed woman.

Admission to the Granite City Book Club is free for Stearns History Museum members, $7 for non-members.  Books are for sale in the Museum store at a 20 percent discount for members.

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Felling auctions purple trailer to benefit pancreatic research http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/felling-auctions-purple-trailer-to-benefit-pancreatic-research/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/felling-auctions-purple-trailer-to-benefit-pancreatic-research/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 23:18:23 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17570 Felling Trailers is conducting its second online auction of a FT-3 drop deck utility trailer to benefit cancer research and support. Felling Trailers wants to bring awareness of and support to pancreatic cancer research. Thus, Felling Trailers manufactured and painted one of its most popular trailers metallic purple to be auctioned online for 10 days during the month of September.

Tredit Tire generously donated the wheels and Midwest Industrial Coatings, Inc. donated the custom metallic purple paint for this trailer and cause. One hundred percent of the winning bid will be donated to Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

Additionally, for each Felling trailer ordered with the custom metallic purple color option, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network will receive 100 percent of the custom color proceeds. A minimum of $200 from each custom color option fee will be donated to Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

The online auction via eBay (listing # 221541740019) will be live through Friday, Sept. 19, at noon, CST. Arrangements will be made for pick up at Felling Trailers’ manufacturing facility or delivery (freight extra).

The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is a national organization creating hope through research, patient support, community outreach and advocacy for a cure. It’s goal is to double pancreatic cancer survival rates by 2020. For more information, visit pancan.org.

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County Highway Department auction set for Thursday http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/county-highway-department-auction-set-for-thursday/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/county-highway-department-auction-set-for-thursday/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 23:06:41 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17556 Stearns County’s Highway Department is holding an auction to sell excess right-of-way properties Thursday, Sept. 18.

There are five properties for sale. Two of the properties are in St. Cloud and have homes; one is an office building in St. Joseph; another is the former park and ride in St. Joseph, and the last parcel is a wetland in Big Stone County.

The four local properties will be sold by auction on the property site. Auctions will occur in two hour intervals, beginning at 10 a.m. and go throughout the day.

The property in Big Stone County will be sold through an online auction.

Interested persons can go to Stearns County’s website at StearnsCountyMN.gov to see the auction flyer and get minimum bid prices, terms and conditions of the sale, auction times, preview dates, photos, and get more details about each of the properties.

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Hamburger Hash Browns http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/hamburger-hash-browns/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/hamburger-hash-browns/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:59:04 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17554 4 c. frozen shredded hash brown potatoes, thawed
3 Tbsp. vegetable oil
1/8 tsp. ground black pepper
1 lb. ground beef
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
1/2 tsp. onion powder
1 c. water
1 (.75 oz. packet dry brown gravy mix
1 c. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9-inch square baking dish. Mix hash brown potatoes, vegetable oil and black pepper in a bowl; press into the bottom of the prepared baking dish. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook and stir beef, garlic powder and onion powder in the hot skillet until beef is browned and crumbly, five to seven minutes; drain and discard grease. Mix water and gravy mix into the cooked beef; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover skillet and simmer until water evaporates, about five minutes. Fold in 1/2 cup Cheddar cheese. Spoon beef mixture onto the potato crust. Bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes. Sprinkle remaining 1/2 cup Cheddar cheese and bake until cheese is lightly browned, about 5 more minutes.

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Spaghetti Pie http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/spaghetti-pie/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/spaghetti-pie/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:58:33 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17552 6 oz. cooked spaghetti
2 eggs
1/2 c. Parmesan cheese
1 lb. hamburger
1/2 c. onion
1 c. water
1/4 c. sour cream
1 (16 oz.) jar spaghetti sauce
8 oz. grated mozzarella cheese

Mix together the cooked spaghetti, eggs and Parmesan cheese. Pat into a pie tin, or an 8-inch x 8-inch square pan. This will be the crust. You may sprinkle more Parmesan cheese on top of this. Brown the hamburger with the onion and drain. Add the water, sour cream and spaghetti sauce to the hamburger. Simmer and stir this for 30 minutes. Pour the hamburger mixture over the spaghetti crust in the pie tin. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from oven and sprinkle the mozzarella cheese on top. Return to oven until the cheese melts. Let sit for five minutes before you cut it.

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Hamburger Stroganoff http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/hamburger-stroganoff/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/hamburger-stroganoff/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:58:14 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17550 2 lbs. hamburger
1 tsp. salt
1 c. chopped celery
1/2 tsp. pepper
1 c. chopped onion
2 c. sour cream
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 c. water
4 oz. mushrooms
1 Tbsp. butter

Brown hamburger, sauté celery, onions in butter until tender. Combine all ingredients except sour cream. Cook until well blended. Just before serving add sour cream and heat through but not boiling. Serve over rice or noodles.

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Sauerkraut Hotdish http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/sauerkraut-hotdish/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/sauerkraut-hotdish/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:57:51 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17548 1 1/2 lb. ground beef
2 cans cream of mushroom soup
1 pkg. egg noodles (uncooked)
1 small can of sauerkraut
Velveeta cheese

Brown ground beef. Place on bottom of 9-inch x 13-inch baking dish. Next place uncooked egg noodles. Mix sauerkraut and soup in a bowl and pour in baking dish. Bake at 350° for 1 hour. Top with thin slices of Velveeta cheese and put back in the oven to melt.

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Hamburger Hotdish http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/hamburger-hotdish/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/hamburger-hotdish/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:57:34 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17546 1 1/2 lbs. hamburger
1 chopped onion
5 oz. box noodles
1/2 c. celery
15 oz. tomato sauce
Salt and pepper

Brown hamburger; cook noodles as directed on box. Add hamburger, noodles, tomato sauce, onions and celery. Heat for 30 minutes. Salt and pepper to taste.

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Hamburger Bake http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/hamburger-bake/ http://dairylandpeach.com/2014/09/hamburger-bake/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:57:15 +0000 http://dairylandpeach.com/?p=17544 1 lb. ground beef
1 small onion, chopped
1 tsp. salt
16 oz. green beans
1 can tomato soup
Mashed potatoes, enough for 4 servings
2 c. shredded cheese

Heat oven to 350°. Cook ground beef and onion until meat is brown. Drain off fat. Mix meat with salt and pepper, beans and tomato soup. Pour into an ungreased 2-quart casserole. Put mashed potatoes on top, then shredded cheese. Bake uncovered for 20 to 30 minutes.

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